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Gnocchi: A Scalable Time Series Database For Your Metrics with Julien Danjou - Episode 189

Summary

Do you know what your servers are doing? If you have a metrics system in place then the answer should be “yes”. One critical aspect of that platform is the timeseries database that allows you to store, aggregate, analyze, and query the various signals generated by your software and hardware. As the size and complexity of your systems scale, so does the volume of data that you need to manage which can put a strain on your metrics stack. Julien Danjou built Gnocchi during his time on the OpenStack project to provide a time oriented data store that would scale horizontally and still provide fast queries. In this episode he explains how the project got started, how it works, how it compares to the other options on the market, and how you can start using it today to get better visibility into your operations.

Preface

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next app or want to try a project you hear about on the show, you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so check out Linode. With 200 Gbit/s private networking, scalable shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40 Gbit/s public network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to scale up. Go to pythonpodcast.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute.
  • And to keep track of how your team is progressing on building new features and squashing bugs, you need a project management system designed by software engineers, for software engineers. Clubhouse lets you craft a workflow that fits your style, including per-team tasks, cross-project epics, a large suite of pre-built integrations, and a simple API for crafting your own. Podcast.__init__ listeners get 2 months free on any plan by going to pythonpodcast.com/clubhouse today and signing up for a trial.
  • Visit the site to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, and read the show notes. And if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions I would love to hear them. You can reach me on Twitter at @Podcast__init__ or email [email protected])
  • To help other people find the show please leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, tell your friends and co-workers, and share it on social media.
  • Join the community in the new Zulip chat workspace at pythonpodcast.com/chat
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Julien Danjou about Gnocchi, an open source time series database built to handle large volumes of system metrics

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • Can you start by describing what Gnocchi is and how the project got started?
    • What was the motivation for moving Gnocchi out of the Openstack organization and into its own top level project?
  • The space of time series databases and metrics as a service platforms are both fairly crowded. What are the unique features of Gnocchi that would lead someone to deploy it in place of other options?
    • What are some of the tools and platforms that are popular today which hadn’t yet gained visibility when you first began working on Gnocchi?
  • How is Gnocchi architected?
    • How has the design changed since you first started working on it?
    • What was the motivation for implementing it in Python and would you make the same choice today?
  • One of the interesting features of Gnocchi is its support of resource history. Can you describe how that operates and the types of use cases that it enables?
    • Does that factor into the multi-tenant architecture?
  • What are some of the drawbacks of pre-aggregating metrics as they are being written into the storage layer (e.g. loss of fidelity)?
    • Is it possible to maintain the raw measures after they are processed into aggregates?
  • One of the challenging aspects of building a scalable metrics platform is support for high-cardinality data. What sort of labelling and tagging of metrics and measures is available in Gnocchi?
  • For someone who wants to implement Gnocchi for their system metrics, what is involved in deploying, maintaining, and upgrading it?
    • What are the available integration points for extending and customizing Gnocchi?
  • Once metrics have been stored, aggregated, and indexed, what are the options for querying and analyzing the collected data?
  • When is Gnocchi the wrong choice?
  • What do you have planned for the future of Gnocchi?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Keeping Up With The Python Community For Fun And Profit with Dan Bader - Episode 188

Summary

Keeping up with the work being done in the Python community can be a full time job, which is why Dan Bader has made it his! In this episode he discusses how he went from working as a software engineer, to offering training, to now managing both the Real Python and PyCoders properties. He also explains his strategies for tracking and curating the content that he produces and discovers, how he thinks about building products, and what he has learned in the process of running his businesses.

Preface

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next app or want to try a project you hear about on the show, you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so check out Linode. With 200 Gbit/s private networking, scalable shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40 Gbit/s public network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to scale up. Go to podcastinit.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute.
  • Visit the site to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, and read the show notes. And if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions I would love to hear them. You can reach me on Twitter at @Podcast__init__ or email [email protected])
  • To help other people find the show please leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, tell your friends and co-workers, and share it on social media.
  • Join the community in the new Zulip chat workspace at podcastinit.com/chat
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Dan Bader about finding, filtering, and creating resources for Python developers at Real Python, PyCoders, and his own trainings

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • Let’s start by discussing your primary job these days and how you got to where you are.
    • In the past year you have also taken over management of the Real Python site. How did that come about and what are your responsibilities?
    • You just recently took over management of the PyCoders newsletter and website. Can you describe the events that led to that outcome and the responsibilities that came along with it?
  • What are the synergies that exist between your various roles and projects?
    • What are the areas of conflict? (e.g. time constraints, conflicts of interest, etc.)
  • Between PyCoders, Real Python, your training materials, your Python tips newsletter, and your coaching you have a lot of incentive to keep up to date with everything happening in the Python ecosystem. What are your strategies for content discovery?
    • With the diversity in use cases, geography, and contributors to the landscape of Python how do you work to counteract any bias or blindspots in your work?
  • There is a constant stream of information about any number of topics and subtopics that involve the Python language and community. What is your process for filtering and curating the resources that are ultimately included in the various media properties that you oversee?
  • In my experience with the podcast one of the most difficult aspects of maintaining relevance as a content creator is obtaining feedback from your audience. What do you do to foster engagement and facilitate conversations around the work that you do?
  • You have also built a few different product offerings. Can you discuss the process involved in identifying the relevant opportunities and the creation and marketing of them?
  • Creating, collecting, and curating content takes a significant investment of time and energy. What are your avenues for ensuring the sustainability of your various projects?
  • What are your plans for the future growth and development of your media empire?
  • As someone who is so deeply involved in the conversations flowing through and around Python, what do you see as being the greatest threats and opportunities for the language and its community?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Bringing Python To The Spanish Language Community with Maricela Sanchez - Episode 185

Summary

The Python Community is large and growing, however a majority of articles, books, and presentations are still in English. To increase the accessibility for Spanish language speakers, Maricela Sanchez helped to create the Charlas track at PyCon US, and is an organizer for Python Day Mexico. In this episode she shares her motivations for getting involved in community building, her experiences working on Python Day Mexico and PyCon Charlas, and the lessons that she has learned in the process.

Preface

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next app you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so check out Linode. With private networking, shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40Gbit network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to scale up. Go to podcastinit.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute.
  • Visit the site to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, and read the show notes. And if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions I would love to hear them. You can reach me on Twitter at @Podcast__init__ or email [email protected])
  • To help other people find the show please leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, tell your friends and co-workers, and share it on social media.
  • Join the community in the new Zulip chat workspace at podcastinit.com/chat
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Maricela Sanchez Miranda about her work in organizing PyCon Charlas, the spanish language track at PyCon US, as well as Python Day Mexico

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • Can you briefly describe PyCon Charlas and Python Day Mexico?
    • What has been your motivation for getting involved with organizing these community events?
  • What do you find to be the unique characteristics of the Python community in Mexico?
  • What kind of feedback have you gotton from the Charlas track at PyCon?
  • What are your goals for fostering these Spanish language events?
  • What are some of the lessons that you have learned from PyCon Charlas that were useful in organizing Python Day Mexico?
  • What have been the most challenging or complicated aspects of organizing Python Day Mexico?
    • How many attendees do you anticipate? How has that affected your planning and preparation?
  • Are there any aspects of the geography, infrastructure, or culture of Mexico that you have found to be either beneficial or challenging for organizing a conference?
  • Do you anticipate PyCon Charlas and Python Day Mexico becoming annual events?
  • What is your advice for anyone who is interested in organizing a conference in their own region or language?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Of Checklists, Ethics, and Data with Emily Miller and Peter Bull - Episode 184

Summary

As data science becomes more widespread and has a bigger impact on the lives of people, it is important that those projects and products are built with a conscious consideration of ethics. Keeping ethical principles in mind throughout the lifecycle of a data project helps to reduce the overall effort of preventing negative outcomes from the use of the final product. Emily Miller and Peter Bull of Driven Data have created Deon to improve the communication and conversation around ethics among and between data teams. It is a Python project that generates a checklist of common concerns for data oriented projects at the various stages of the lifecycle where they should be considered. In this episode they discuss their motivation for creating the project, the challenges and benefits of maintaining such a checklist, and how you can start using it today.

Preface

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next app you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so check out Linode. With private networking, shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40Gbit network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to scale up. Go to podcastinit.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute.
  • Visit the site to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, and read the show notes. And if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions I would love to hear them. You can reach me on Twitter at @Podcast__init__ or email [email protected])
  • To help other people find the show please leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, tell your friends and co-workers, and share it on social media.
  • Join the community in the new Zulip chat workspace at podcastinit.com/chat
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Emily Miller and Peter Bull about Deon, an ethics checklist for data projects

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • Can you start by describing what Deon is and your motivation for creating it?
  • Why a checklist, specifically? What’s the advantage of this over an oath, for example?
  • What is unique to data science in terms of the ethical concerns, as compared to traditional software engineering?
  • What is the typical workflow for a team that is using Deon in their projects?
  • Deon ships with a default checklist but allows for customization. What are some common addendums that you have seen?
    • Have you received pushback on any of the default items?
  • How does Deon simplify communication around ethics across team boundaries?
  • What are some of the most often overlooked items?
  • What are some of the most difficult ethical concerns to comply with for a typical data science project?
  • How has Deon helped you at Driven Data?
  • What are the customer facing impacts of embedding a discussion of ethics in the product development process?
  • Some of the items on the default checklist coincide with regulatory requirements. Are there any cases where regulation is in conflict with an ethical concern that you would like to see practiced?
  • What are your hopes for the future of the Deon project?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Building A Game In Python At PyWeek with Daniel Pope - Episode 182

Summary

Many people learn to program because of their interest in building their own video games. Once the necessary skills have been acquired, it is often the case that the original idea of creating a game is forgotten in favor of solving the problems we confront at work. Game jams are a great way to get inspired and motivated to finally write a game from scratch. This week Daniel Pope discusses the origin and format for PyWeek, his experience as a participant, and the landscape of options for building a game in Python. He also explains how you can register and compete in the next competition.

Preface

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next app you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so check out Linode. With private networking, shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40Gbit network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to scale up. Go to podcastinit.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute.
  • Visit the site to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, and read the show notes. And if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions I would love to hear them. You can reach me on Twitter at @Podcast__init__ or email [email protected])
  • To help other people find the show please leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, tell your friends and co-workers, and share it on social media.
  • Join the community in the new Zulip chat workspace at podcastinit.com/chat
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Daniel Pope about PyWeek, a one week challenge to build a game in Python

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • Can you start by describing what PyWeek is and how the competition got started?
    • What is your current role in relation to PyWeek and how did you get involved?
  • What are the strengths of the Python lanaguage and ecosystem for developing a game?
  • What are some of the common difficulties encountered by participants in the challenge?
  • What are some of the most commonly used libraries and tools for creating and packaging the games?
  • What are some shortcomings in the available tools or libraries for Python when it comes to game development?
  • What are some examples of libraries or tools that were created and released as a result of a team’s efforts during PyWeek?
  • How often do games that get started during PyWeek continue to be developed and improved?
    • Have there ever been games that went on to be commercially viable?
  • What are some of the most interesting or unusual games that you have seen submitted to PyWeek?
  • Can you describe your experience as a competitor in PyWeek?
    • How do you structure your time during the competition week to ensure that you can complete your game?
  • What are the benefits and difficulties of the one week constraint for development?
  • How has PyWeek changed over the years that you have been involved with it?
  • What are your hopes for the competition as it continues into the future?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Django, Channels, And The Asynchronous Web with Andrew Godwin - Episode 180

Summary

Once upon a time the web was a simple place with one main protocol and a predictable sequence of request/response interactions with backend applications. This is the era when Django began, but in the intervening years there has been an explosion of complexity with new asynchronous protocols and single page Javascript applications. To help bridge the gap and bring the most popular Python web framework into the modern age Andrew Godwin created Channels. In this episode he explains how the first version of the asynchronous layer for Django applications was created, how it has changed in the jump to version 2, and where it will go in the future. Along the way he also discusses the challenges of async development, his work on designing ASGI as the spiritual successor to WSGI, and how you can start using all of this in your own projects today.

Preface

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next app you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so check out Linode. With private networking, shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40Gbit network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to scale up. Go to podcastinit.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute.
  • Visit the site to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, and read the show notes. And if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions I would love to hear them. You can reach me on Twitter at @Podcast__init__ or email [email protected])
  • To help other people find the show please leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, tell your friends and co-workers, and share it on social media.
  • Join the community in the new Zulip chat workspace at podcastinit.com/chat
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Andrew Godwin about Django Channels 2.x and the ASGI specification for modern, asynchronous web protocols

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • Can you start with an overview of the problem that Channels is aiming to solve?
  • Asynchronous frameworks have existed in Python for a long time. What are the tradeoffs in those frameworks that would lead someone to prefer the combination of Django and Channels?
  • For someone who is familiar with traditional Django or working on an existing application, what are the steps involved in integrating Channels?
  • Channels is a project that you have been working on for a significant amount of time and which you recently re-architected. What were the shortcomings in the 1.x release that necessitated such a major rewrite?
    • How is the current system architected?
  • What have you found to be the most challenging or confusing aspects of managing asynchronous web protocols both as an author of Channels/ASGI and someone building on top of them?
    • While reading through the documentation there were mentions of the synchronous nature of the Django ORM. What are your thoughts on asynchronous database access and how important that is for future versions of Django and Channels?
  • As part of your implementation of Channels 2.x you introduced a new protocol for asynchronous web applications in Python in the form of ASGI. How does this differ from the WSGI standard and what was your process for developing this specification?
    • What are your hopes for what the Python community will do with ASGI?
  • What are your plans for the future of Channels?
  • What are some of the most interesting or unexpected uses of Channels and/or ASGI?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Don't Just Stand There, Get Programming! with Ana Bell - Episode 175

Summary

Writing a book is hard work, especially when you are trying to teach such a broad concept as programming. In this episode Ana Bell discusses her recent work in writing Get Programming: Learn To Code With Python, including her views on how to separate the principles from the implementation, making the book evergreen in its appeal, and how her experience as a lecturer at MIT has helped her maintain the perspectives of beginners. She also shares her views on the values of learning about programming, even when you have no intention of doing it as a career and ways to take the next steps if that is your goal.

Preface

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next app you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so check out Linode. With private networking, shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40Gbit network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to scale up. Go to podcastinit.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute.
  • As you know, Python has become one of the most popular programming languages in the world, due to the size, scope, and friendliness of the language and community. But, it can be tough learning it when you’re just starting out. Luckily, there’s an easy way to get involved. Written by MIT lecturer Ana Bell and published by Manning Publications, Get Programming: Learn to code with Python is the perfect way to get started working with Python. Ana’s experience as a teacher of Python really shines through, as you get hands-on with the language without being drowned in confusing jargon or theory. Filled with practical examples and step-by-step lessons to take on, Get Programming is perfect for people who just want to get stuck in with Python. Get your copy of the book with a special 40% discount for Podcast.__init__ listeners at podcastinit.com/get-programming using code: Bell40!
  • Visit the site to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, and read the show notes. And if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions I would love to hear them. You can reach me on Twitter at @Podcast__init__ or email [email protected])
  • To help other people find the show please leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, tell your friends and co-workers, and share it on social media.
  • Join the community in the new Zulip chat workspace at podcastinit.com/chat
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Ana Bell about her book, Get Programming: Learn to code with Python, and her approach to teaching how to code

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • Can you start by describing your motivation for writing a book about learning to program?
    • Who is the target audience for this book?
    • What level of competence do you want the reader to have when they have completed it?
  • What were the most challenging aspects of writing a book for beginning programmers?
    • What did you do to recapture the “beginner mind” while writing?
  • There are a large variety of books on learning to program and at least as many approaches. Can you describe the techniques that you use in your book to help readers grasp the concepts that you cover?
  • One of the problems of writing a book about technology is that there is no stationary target to aim for due to the constant advancement of the industry. How do you reconcile that reality with the need for a book to remain relevant for an extended period of time?
    • How do you decide what to include and what to leave out when writing about learning how to program?
  • What advice do you have for people who have read your book and want to continue on to a career in development?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Continuous Delivery For Complex Systems Using Zuul with Monty Taylor - Episode 172

Summary

Continuous integration systems are important for ensuring that you don’t release broken software. Some projects can benefit from simple, standardized platforms, but as you grow or factor in additional projects the complexity of checking your deployments grows. Zuul is a deployment automation and gating system that was built to power the complexities of OpenStack so it will grow and scale with you. In this episode Monty Taylor explains how he helped start Zuul, how it is designed for scale, and how you can start using it for your continuous delivery systems. He also discusses how Zuul has evolved and the directions it will take in the future.

Preface

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next app you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so check out Linode. With private networking, shared block storage, node balancers, and a 200Gbit network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to scale up. Go to podcastinit.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute.
  • Visit the site to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, and read the show notes. And if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions I would love to hear them. You can reach me on Twitter at @Podcast__init__ or email [email protected])
  • To help other people find the show please leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, tell your friends and co-workers, and share it on social media.
  • Join the community in the new Zulip chat workspace at podcastinit.com/chat
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Monty Taylor about Zuul, a platform that drives continuous integration, delivery, and deployment systems with a focus on project gating and interrelated projects.

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • Can you start by explaining what Zuul is and how the project got started?
  • How do you view Zuul in the broader landscape of CI/CD systems (e.g. GoCD, Jenkins, Travis, etc.)?
  • What is the workflow for someone who is defining a pipeline in Zuul?
    • How are the pipelines tested and promoted?
    • One of the problems that are often encountered in CI/CD systems is the difficulty of testing changes locally. What kind of support is available in Zuul for that?
  • Can you describe the project architecture?
    • What aspects of the architecture enable it to scale to large projects and teams?
  • How difficult would it be to swap the Ansible integration for another orchestration tool?
  • What would be involved in adding support for additional version control systems?
  • What are your plans for the future of the project?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Michael Foord On Testing, Mock, TDD, And The Python Community - Episode 171

Summary

Michael Foord has been working on building and testing software in Python for over a decade. One of his most notable and widely used contributions to the community is the Mock library, which has been incorporated into the standard library. In this episode he explains how he got involved in the community, why testing has been such a strong focus throughout his career, the uses and hazards of mocked objects, and how he is transitioning to freelancing full time.

Preface

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next app you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so check out Linode. With private networking, shared block storage, node balancers, and a 200Gbit network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to scale up. Go to podcastinit.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute.
  • Visit the site to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, and read the show notes. And if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions I would love to hear them. You can reach me on Twitter at @Podcast__init__ or email [email protected])
  • To help other people find the show please leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, tell your friends and co-workers, and share it on social media.
  • Join the community in the new Zulip chat workspace at podcastinit.com/chat
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Michael Foord mockingly, about his career in Python

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • One of the main threads in your career appears to be software testing. What aspects of testing do you find so interesting and how did you first get exposed to that aspect of building software?
    • How has the language and ecosystem support for testing evolved over the course of your career?
    • What are some of the areas that you find it to still be lacking?
  • Mock is one of your projects that has been widely adopted and ultimately incorporated into the standard library. What was your reason for starting it in the first place?
    • Mocking can be a controversial topic. What are your current thoughts on how and when to use mocks, stubs, and fixtures?
  • How do you view the state of the art for testing in Python as it compares to other languages that you have worked in?
  • You were fairly early in the move to supporting Python 2 and 3 in a single project with Mock. How has that overall experience changed in the intervening years since Python 2.4 and 3.2?
  • What are some of the notable evolutions in Python and the software industry that you have experienced over your career?
  • You recently transitioned to acting as a software trainer and consultant full time. Where are you focusing your energy currently and what are your grand plans for the future?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

The Past, Present, and Future of Twisted with Moshe Zadka - Episode 170

Summary

Twisted is one of the earliest frameworks for developing asynchronous applications in Python and it has yet to fulfill its original purpose. It can be used to build network servers that integrate a multitude of protocols, increase the performance of your I/O bound applications, serve as the full web stack for your WSGI projects, and anything else that needs a battle tested and performant foundation. In this episode long time maintainer Moshe Zadka discusses the history of Twisted, how it has evolved over the years, the transition to Python 3, some of its myriad use cases, and where it is headed in the future. Try it out today and then send some thanks to all of the people who have dedicated their time to building it.

Preface

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next app you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so check out Linode. With private networking, shared block storage, node balancers, and a 200Gbit network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to scale up. Go to podcastinit.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute.
  • To get worry-free releases download GoCD, the open source continous delivery server built by Thoughworks. You can use their pipeline modeling and value stream map to build, control and monitor every step from commit to deployment in one place. And with their new Kubernetes integration it’s even easier to deploy and scale your build agents. Go to podcastinit.com/gocd to learn more about their professional support services and enterprise add-ons.
  • Visit the site to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, and read the show notes. And if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions I would love to hear them. You can reach me on Twitter at @Podcast__init__ or email [email protected])
  • To help other people find the show please leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, tell your friends and co-workers, and share it on social media.
  • Join the community in the new Zulip chat workspace at podcastinit.com/chat
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Moshe Zadka about Twisted, the original multi-function tool for asynchronous operations and network protocols in Python

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • For anyone who isn’t familiar with Twisted can you share a brief overview of what it is?
    • What was the original motivation for creating it?
    • How did you get involved with the project and what is your current role in the team?
  • How can people learn to use Twisted?
    • What are some of the common difficulties that new users encounter?
  • What did you learn working on Twisted?
  • Who uses Twisted?
    • When is Twisted the wrong choice?
    • What are some examples of systems that aren’t using Twisted but should be?
  • What are some of the ways that Twisted has evolved and changed over the years?
  • What are some of the ways people can support Twisted?
  • What are some of the plans for the future of Twisted?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA