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Exploring Indico: A Full Featured Event Management Platform - Episode 208

Summary

Managing an event is rife with inherent complexity that scales as you move from scheduling a meeting to organizing a conference. Indico is a platform built at CERN to handle their efforts to organize events such as the Computing in High Energy Physics (CHEP) conference, and now it has grown to manage booking of meeting rooms. In this episode Adrian Mönnich, core developer on the Indico project, explains how it is architected to facilitate this use case, how it has evolved since its first incarnation two decades ago, and what he has learned while working on it. The Indico platform is definitely a feature rich and mature platform that is worth considering if you are responsible for organizing a conference or need a room booking system for your office.

Announcements

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next app or want to try a project you hear about on the show, you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so take a look at our friends over at Linode. With 200 Gbit/s private networking, scalable shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40 Gbit/s public network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to scale up. And for your tasks that need fast computation, such as training machine learning models, they just launched dedicated CPU instances. Go to pythonpodcast.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute. And don’t forget to thank them for their continued support of this show!
  • Bots and automation are taking over whole categories of online interaction. Discover.bot is an online community designed to serve as a platform-agnostic digital space for bot developers and enthusiasts of all skill levels to learn from one another, share their stories, and move the conversation forward together. They regularly publish guides and resources to help you learn about topics such as bot development, using them for business, and the latest in chatbot news. For newcomers to the space they have the Beginners Guide To Bots that will teach you the basics of how bots work, what they can do, and where they are developed and published. To help you choose the right framework and avoid the confusion about which NLU features and platform APIs you will need they have compiled a list of the major options and how they compare. Go to pythonpodcast.com/discoverbot today to get started and thank them for their support of the show.
  • You listen to this show to learn and stay up to date with the ways that Python is being used, including the latest in machine learning and data analysis. For even more opportunities to meet, listen, and learn from your peers you don’t want to miss out on this year’s conference season. We have partnered with organizations such as O’Reilly Media, Dataversity, and the Open Data Science Conference. Go to pythonpodcast.com/conferences to learn more and take advantage of our partner discounts when you register.
  • Visit the site to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, and read the show notes. And if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions I would love to hear them. You can reach me on Twitter at @Podcast__init__ or email [email protected])
  • To help other people find the show please leave a review on iTunes and tell your friends and co-workers
  • Join the community in the new Zulip chat workspace at pythonpodcast.com/chat
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Adrian Mönnich about Indico, the effortless open-source tool for event organisation, archival and collaboration

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • Can you start by describing what Indico is and how the project got started?
    • What are some other projects which target a similar use case and what were they lacking that led to Indico being necessary?
  • Can you talk through an example workflow for setting up and managing an event in Indico?
    • How does the lifecycle change when working with larger events, such as PyCon?
  • Can you describe how Indico is architected and how its design has evolved since it was first built?
    • What are some of the most complex or challenging portions of Indico to implement and maintain?
  • There are a lot of areas for exercising constraint resolution algorithms. Can you talk through some of the business logic of how that operates?
  • Most of Indico is highly configurable and flexible. How do you approach managing sane defaults to prevent users getting overwhelmed when onboarding?
    • What is your approach to testing given how complex the project is?
  • What are some of the most interesting or unexpected ways that you have seen Indico used?
  • What are some of the most interesting/unexpected lessons that you have learned in the process of building Indico?
  • What do you have planned for the future of the project?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

A Quick Python Check-in With Naomi Ceder - Episode 204

Summary

Naomi Ceder was fortunate enough to learn Python from Guido himself. Since then she has contributed books, code, and mentorship to the community. Currently she serves as the chair of the board to the Python Software Foundation, leads an engineering team, and has recently completed a new draft of the Quick Python Book. In this episode she shares her story, including a discussion of her experience as a technical author and a detailed account of the role that the PSF plays in supporting and growing the community.

Announcements

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next app or want to try a project you hear about on the show, you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so take a look at our friends over at Linode. With 200 Gbit/s private networking, scalable shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40 Gbit/s public network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to scale up. And for your tasks that need fast computation, such as training machine learning models, they just launched dedicated CPU instances. Go to pythonpodcast.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute. And don’t forget to thank them for their continued support of this show!
  • Visit the site to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, and read the show notes. And if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions I would love to hear them. You can reach me on Twitter at @Podcast__init__ or email [email protected])
  • To help other people find the show please leave a review on iTunes and tell your friends and co-workers
  • Join the community in the new Zulip chat workspace at pythonpodcast.com/chat
  • Check out the Practical AI podcast from our friends at Changelog Media to learn and stay up to date with what’s happening in AI
  • You listen to this show to learn and stay up to date with what’s happening in databases, streaming platforms, big data, and everything else you need to know about modern data management. For even more opportunities to meet, listen, and learn from your peers you don’t want to miss out on this year’s conference season. We have partnered with organizations such as O’Reilly Media, Dataversity, and the Open Data Science Conference. Go to pythonpodcast.com/conferences to learn more and take advantage of our partner discounts when you register.
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Naomi Ceder about her career and contributions in the Python community

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • How are you using Python in your current day-to-day?
  • You have been working with Python for a long time at this point, and you have become very involved in supporting and growing the community. What is your motivation for dedicating so much of your time and energy into work that isn’t directly related to paying the bills?
  • You have been the chair of the PSF for a few years now. What are your responsibilities in that position?
  • What do you find to be the most under-rated, misunderstood, or overlooked activities of the PSF?
    • How much of the success of the Python language and its community can be attributed to the presence and support of the PSF?
  • In addition to the work you do with the PSF, other community activities, and your day job, you have also written the 2nd and 3rd editions of the Quick Python Book. Can you give a synopsis of what the book covers and the audience that it is intended for?
  • In the process of writing the book and updating it between revisions, what are some of the features of the language or standard library that you discovered or learned more about which you have been able to use in your work?
  • What are some of the other language communities that you have been involved with and what lessons have you learned from them that you would like to see reflected in Python?
  • What are some of the other projects that you have been involved with that you are most proud of, whether technical or otherwise?
  • What are you most excited about in the near to medium future?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Gnocchi: A Scalable Time Series Database For Your Metrics with Julien Danjou - Episode 189

Summary

Do you know what your servers are doing? If you have a metrics system in place then the answer should be “yes”. One critical aspect of that platform is the timeseries database that allows you to store, aggregate, analyze, and query the various signals generated by your software and hardware. As the size and complexity of your systems scale, so does the volume of data that you need to manage which can put a strain on your metrics stack. Julien Danjou built Gnocchi during his time on the OpenStack project to provide a time oriented data store that would scale horizontally and still provide fast queries. In this episode he explains how the project got started, how it works, how it compares to the other options on the market, and how you can start using it today to get better visibility into your operations.

Preface

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next app or want to try a project you hear about on the show, you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so check out Linode. With 200 Gbit/s private networking, scalable shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40 Gbit/s public network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to scale up. Go to pythonpodcast.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute.
  • And to keep track of how your team is progressing on building new features and squashing bugs, you need a project management system designed by software engineers, for software engineers. Clubhouse lets you craft a workflow that fits your style, including per-team tasks, cross-project epics, a large suite of pre-built integrations, and a simple API for crafting your own. Podcast.__init__ listeners get 2 months free on any plan by going to pythonpodcast.com/clubhouse today and signing up for a trial.
  • Visit the site to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, and read the show notes. And if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions I would love to hear them. You can reach me on Twitter at @Podcast__init__ or email [email protected])
  • To help other people find the show please leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, tell your friends and co-workers, and share it on social media.
  • Join the community in the new Zulip chat workspace at pythonpodcast.com/chat
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Julien Danjou about Gnocchi, an open source time series database built to handle large volumes of system metrics

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • Can you start by describing what Gnocchi is and how the project got started?
    • What was the motivation for moving Gnocchi out of the Openstack organization and into its own top level project?
  • The space of time series databases and metrics as a service platforms are both fairly crowded. What are the unique features of Gnocchi that would lead someone to deploy it in place of other options?
    • What are some of the tools and platforms that are popular today which hadn’t yet gained visibility when you first began working on Gnocchi?
  • How is Gnocchi architected?
    • How has the design changed since you first started working on it?
    • What was the motivation for implementing it in Python and would you make the same choice today?
  • One of the interesting features of Gnocchi is its support of resource history. Can you describe how that operates and the types of use cases that it enables?
    • Does that factor into the multi-tenant architecture?
  • What are some of the drawbacks of pre-aggregating metrics as they are being written into the storage layer (e.g. loss of fidelity)?
    • Is it possible to maintain the raw measures after they are processed into aggregates?
  • One of the challenging aspects of building a scalable metrics platform is support for high-cardinality data. What sort of labelling and tagging of metrics and measures is available in Gnocchi?
  • For someone who wants to implement Gnocchi for their system metrics, what is involved in deploying, maintaining, and upgrading it?
    • What are the available integration points for extending and customizing Gnocchi?
  • Once metrics have been stored, aggregated, and indexed, what are the options for querying and analyzing the collected data?
  • When is Gnocchi the wrong choice?
  • What do you have planned for the future of Gnocchi?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Keeping Up With The Python Community For Fun And Profit with Dan Bader - Episode 188

Summary

Keeping up with the work being done in the Python community can be a full time job, which is why Dan Bader has made it his! In this episode he discusses how he went from working as a software engineer, to offering training, to now managing both the Real Python and PyCoders properties. He also explains his strategies for tracking and curating the content that he produces and discovers, how he thinks about building products, and what he has learned in the process of running his businesses.

Preface

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next app or want to try a project you hear about on the show, you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so check out Linode. With 200 Gbit/s private networking, scalable shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40 Gbit/s public network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to scale up. Go to podcastinit.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute.
  • Visit the site to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, and read the show notes. And if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions I would love to hear them. You can reach me on Twitter at @Podcast__init__ or email [email protected])
  • To help other people find the show please leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, tell your friends and co-workers, and share it on social media.
  • Join the community in the new Zulip chat workspace at podcastinit.com/chat
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Dan Bader about finding, filtering, and creating resources for Python developers at Real Python, PyCoders, and his own trainings

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • Let’s start by discussing your primary job these days and how you got to where you are.
    • In the past year you have also taken over management of the Real Python site. How did that come about and what are your responsibilities?
    • You just recently took over management of the PyCoders newsletter and website. Can you describe the events that led to that outcome and the responsibilities that came along with it?
  • What are the synergies that exist between your various roles and projects?
    • What are the areas of conflict? (e.g. time constraints, conflicts of interest, etc.)
  • Between PyCoders, Real Python, your training materials, your Python tips newsletter, and your coaching you have a lot of incentive to keep up to date with everything happening in the Python ecosystem. What are your strategies for content discovery?
    • With the diversity in use cases, geography, and contributors to the landscape of Python how do you work to counteract any bias or blindspots in your work?
  • There is a constant stream of information about any number of topics and subtopics that involve the Python language and community. What is your process for filtering and curating the resources that are ultimately included in the various media properties that you oversee?
  • In my experience with the podcast one of the most difficult aspects of maintaining relevance as a content creator is obtaining feedback from your audience. What do you do to foster engagement and facilitate conversations around the work that you do?
  • You have also built a few different product offerings. Can you discuss the process involved in identifying the relevant opportunities and the creation and marketing of them?
  • Creating, collecting, and curating content takes a significant investment of time and energy. What are your avenues for ensuring the sustainability of your various projects?
  • What are your plans for the future growth and development of your media empire?
  • As someone who is so deeply involved in the conversations flowing through and around Python, what do you see as being the greatest threats and opportunities for the language and its community?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Bringing Python To The Spanish Language Community with Maricela Sanchez - Episode 185

Summary

The Python Community is large and growing, however a majority of articles, books, and presentations are still in English. To increase the accessibility for Spanish language speakers, Maricela Sanchez helped to create the Charlas track at PyCon US, and is an organizer for Python Day Mexico. In this episode she shares her motivations for getting involved in community building, her experiences working on Python Day Mexico and PyCon Charlas, and the lessons that she has learned in the process.

Preface

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next app you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so check out Linode. With private networking, shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40Gbit network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to scale up. Go to podcastinit.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute.
  • Visit the site to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, and read the show notes. And if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions I would love to hear them. You can reach me on Twitter at @Podcast__init__ or email [email protected])
  • To help other people find the show please leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, tell your friends and co-workers, and share it on social media.
  • Join the community in the new Zulip chat workspace at podcastinit.com/chat
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Maricela Sanchez Miranda about her work in organizing PyCon Charlas, the spanish language track at PyCon US, as well as Python Day Mexico

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • Can you briefly describe PyCon Charlas and Python Day Mexico?
    • What has been your motivation for getting involved with organizing these community events?
  • What do you find to be the unique characteristics of the Python community in Mexico?
  • What kind of feedback have you gotton from the Charlas track at PyCon?
  • What are your goals for fostering these Spanish language events?
  • What are some of the lessons that you have learned from PyCon Charlas that were useful in organizing Python Day Mexico?
  • What have been the most challenging or complicated aspects of organizing Python Day Mexico?
    • How many attendees do you anticipate? How has that affected your planning and preparation?
  • Are there any aspects of the geography, infrastructure, or culture of Mexico that you have found to be either beneficial or challenging for organizing a conference?
  • Do you anticipate PyCon Charlas and Python Day Mexico becoming annual events?
  • What is your advice for anyone who is interested in organizing a conference in their own region or language?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Of Checklists, Ethics, and Data with Emily Miller and Peter Bull - Episode 184

Summary

As data science becomes more widespread and has a bigger impact on the lives of people, it is important that those projects and products are built with a conscious consideration of ethics. Keeping ethical principles in mind throughout the lifecycle of a data project helps to reduce the overall effort of preventing negative outcomes from the use of the final product. Emily Miller and Peter Bull of Driven Data have created Deon to improve the communication and conversation around ethics among and between data teams. It is a Python project that generates a checklist of common concerns for data oriented projects at the various stages of the lifecycle where they should be considered. In this episode they discuss their motivation for creating the project, the challenges and benefits of maintaining such a checklist, and how you can start using it today.

Preface

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next app you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so check out Linode. With private networking, shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40Gbit network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to scale up. Go to podcastinit.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute.
  • Visit the site to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, and read the show notes. And if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions I would love to hear them. You can reach me on Twitter at @Podcast__init__ or email [email protected])
  • To help other people find the show please leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, tell your friends and co-workers, and share it on social media.
  • Join the community in the new Zulip chat workspace at podcastinit.com/chat
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Emily Miller and Peter Bull about Deon, an ethics checklist for data projects

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • Can you start by describing what Deon is and your motivation for creating it?
  • Why a checklist, specifically? What’s the advantage of this over an oath, for example?
  • What is unique to data science in terms of the ethical concerns, as compared to traditional software engineering?
  • What is the typical workflow for a team that is using Deon in their projects?
  • Deon ships with a default checklist but allows for customization. What are some common addendums that you have seen?
    • Have you received pushback on any of the default items?
  • How does Deon simplify communication around ethics across team boundaries?
  • What are some of the most often overlooked items?
  • What are some of the most difficult ethical concerns to comply with for a typical data science project?
  • How has Deon helped you at Driven Data?
  • What are the customer facing impacts of embedding a discussion of ethics in the product development process?
  • Some of the items on the default checklist coincide with regulatory requirements. Are there any cases where regulation is in conflict with an ethical concern that you would like to see practiced?
  • What are your hopes for the future of the Deon project?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Building A Game In Python At PyWeek with Daniel Pope - Episode 182

Summary

Many people learn to program because of their interest in building their own video games. Once the necessary skills have been acquired, it is often the case that the original idea of creating a game is forgotten in favor of solving the problems we confront at work. Game jams are a great way to get inspired and motivated to finally write a game from scratch. This week Daniel Pope discusses the origin and format for PyWeek, his experience as a participant, and the landscape of options for building a game in Python. He also explains how you can register and compete in the next competition.

Preface

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next app you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so check out Linode. With private networking, shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40Gbit network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to scale up. Go to podcastinit.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute.
  • Visit the site to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, and read the show notes. And if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions I would love to hear them. You can reach me on Twitter at @Podcast__init__ or email [email protected])
  • To help other people find the show please leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, tell your friends and co-workers, and share it on social media.
  • Join the community in the new Zulip chat workspace at podcastinit.com/chat
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Daniel Pope about PyWeek, a one week challenge to build a game in Python

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • Can you start by describing what PyWeek is and how the competition got started?
    • What is your current role in relation to PyWeek and how did you get involved?
  • What are the strengths of the Python lanaguage and ecosystem for developing a game?
  • What are some of the common difficulties encountered by participants in the challenge?
  • What are some of the most commonly used libraries and tools for creating and packaging the games?
  • What are some shortcomings in the available tools or libraries for Python when it comes to game development?
  • What are some examples of libraries or tools that were created and released as a result of a team’s efforts during PyWeek?
  • How often do games that get started during PyWeek continue to be developed and improved?
    • Have there ever been games that went on to be commercially viable?
  • What are some of the most interesting or unusual games that you have seen submitted to PyWeek?
  • Can you describe your experience as a competitor in PyWeek?
    • How do you structure your time during the competition week to ensure that you can complete your game?
  • What are the benefits and difficulties of the one week constraint for development?
  • How has PyWeek changed over the years that you have been involved with it?
  • What are your hopes for the competition as it continues into the future?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Django, Channels, And The Asynchronous Web with Andrew Godwin - Episode 180

Summary

Once upon a time the web was a simple place with one main protocol and a predictable sequence of request/response interactions with backend applications. This is the era when Django began, but in the intervening years there has been an explosion of complexity with new asynchronous protocols and single page Javascript applications. To help bridge the gap and bring the most popular Python web framework into the modern age Andrew Godwin created Channels. In this episode he explains how the first version of the asynchronous layer for Django applications was created, how it has changed in the jump to version 2, and where it will go in the future. Along the way he also discusses the challenges of async development, his work on designing ASGI as the spiritual successor to WSGI, and how you can start using all of this in your own projects today.

Preface

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next app you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so check out Linode. With private networking, shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40Gbit network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to scale up. Go to podcastinit.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute.
  • Visit the site to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, and read the show notes. And if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions I would love to hear them. You can reach me on Twitter at @Podcast__init__ or email [email protected])
  • To help other people find the show please leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, tell your friends and co-workers, and share it on social media.
  • Join the community in the new Zulip chat workspace at podcastinit.com/chat
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Andrew Godwin about Django Channels 2.x and the ASGI specification for modern, asynchronous web protocols

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • Can you start with an overview of the problem that Channels is aiming to solve?
  • Asynchronous frameworks have existed in Python for a long time. What are the tradeoffs in those frameworks that would lead someone to prefer the combination of Django and Channels?
  • For someone who is familiar with traditional Django or working on an existing application, what are the steps involved in integrating Channels?
  • Channels is a project that you have been working on for a significant amount of time and which you recently re-architected. What were the shortcomings in the 1.x release that necessitated such a major rewrite?
    • How is the current system architected?
  • What have you found to be the most challenging or confusing aspects of managing asynchronous web protocols both as an author of Channels/ASGI and someone building on top of them?
    • While reading through the documentation there were mentions of the synchronous nature of the Django ORM. What are your thoughts on asynchronous database access and how important that is for future versions of Django and Channels?
  • As part of your implementation of Channels 2.x you introduced a new protocol for asynchronous web applications in Python in the form of ASGI. How does this differ from the WSGI standard and what was your process for developing this specification?
    • What are your hopes for what the Python community will do with ASGI?
  • What are your plans for the future of Channels?
  • What are some of the most interesting or unexpected uses of Channels and/or ASGI?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Don't Just Stand There, Get Programming! with Ana Bell - Episode 175

Summary

Writing a book is hard work, especially when you are trying to teach such a broad concept as programming. In this episode Ana Bell discusses her recent work in writing Get Programming: Learn To Code With Python, including her views on how to separate the principles from the implementation, making the book evergreen in its appeal, and how her experience as a lecturer at MIT has helped her maintain the perspectives of beginners. She also shares her views on the values of learning about programming, even when you have no intention of doing it as a career and ways to take the next steps if that is your goal.

Preface

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next app you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so check out Linode. With private networking, shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40Gbit network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to scale up. Go to podcastinit.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute.
  • As you know, Python has become one of the most popular programming languages in the world, due to the size, scope, and friendliness of the language and community. But, it can be tough learning it when you’re just starting out. Luckily, there’s an easy way to get involved. Written by MIT lecturer Ana Bell and published by Manning Publications, Get Programming: Learn to code with Python is the perfect way to get started working with Python. Ana’s experience as a teacher of Python really shines through, as you get hands-on with the language without being drowned in confusing jargon or theory. Filled with practical examples and step-by-step lessons to take on, Get Programming is perfect for people who just want to get stuck in with Python. Get your copy of the book with a special 40% discount for Podcast.__init__ listeners at podcastinit.com/get-programming using code: Bell40!
  • Visit the site to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, and read the show notes. And if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions I would love to hear them. You can reach me on Twitter at @Podcast__init__ or email [email protected])
  • To help other people find the show please leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, tell your friends and co-workers, and share it on social media.
  • Join the community in the new Zulip chat workspace at podcastinit.com/chat
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Ana Bell about her book, Get Programming: Learn to code with Python, and her approach to teaching how to code

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • Can you start by describing your motivation for writing a book about learning to program?
    • Who is the target audience for this book?
    • What level of competence do you want the reader to have when they have completed it?
  • What were the most challenging aspects of writing a book for beginning programmers?
    • What did you do to recapture the “beginner mind” while writing?
  • There are a large variety of books on learning to program and at least as many approaches. Can you describe the techniques that you use in your book to help readers grasp the concepts that you cover?
  • One of the problems of writing a book about technology is that there is no stationary target to aim for due to the constant advancement of the industry. How do you reconcile that reality with the need for a book to remain relevant for an extended period of time?
    • How do you decide what to include and what to leave out when writing about learning how to program?
  • What advice do you have for people who have read your book and want to continue on to a career in development?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Continuous Delivery For Complex Systems Using Zuul with Monty Taylor - Episode 172

Summary

Continuous integration systems are important for ensuring that you don’t release broken software. Some projects can benefit from simple, standardized platforms, but as you grow or factor in additional projects the complexity of checking your deployments grows. Zuul is a deployment automation and gating system that was built to power the complexities of OpenStack so it will grow and scale with you. In this episode Monty Taylor explains how he helped start Zuul, how it is designed for scale, and how you can start using it for your continuous delivery systems. He also discusses how Zuul has evolved and the directions it will take in the future.

Preface

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
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  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Monty Taylor about Zuul, a platform that drives continuous integration, delivery, and deployment systems with a focus on project gating and interrelated projects.

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • Can you start by explaining what Zuul is and how the project got started?
  • How do you view Zuul in the broader landscape of CI/CD systems (e.g. GoCD, Jenkins, Travis, etc.)?
  • What is the workflow for someone who is defining a pipeline in Zuul?
    • How are the pipelines tested and promoted?
    • One of the problems that are often encountered in CI/CD systems is the difficulty of testing changes locally. What kind of support is available in Zuul for that?
  • Can you describe the project architecture?
    • What aspects of the architecture enable it to scale to large projects and teams?
  • How difficult would it be to swap the Ansible integration for another orchestration tool?
  • What would be involved in adding support for additional version control systems?
  • What are your plans for the future of the project?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA