Diversity

Bringing Python To The Spanish Language Community with Maricela Sanchez - Episode 185

Summary

The Python Community is large and growing, however a majority of articles, books, and presentations are still in English. To increase the accessibility for Spanish language speakers, Maricela Sanchez helped to create the Charlas track at PyCon US, and is an organizer for Python Day Mexico. In this episode she shares her motivations for getting involved in community building, her experiences working on Python Day Mexico and PyCon Charlas, and the lessons that she has learned in the process.

Preface

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next app you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so check out Linode. With private networking, shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40Gbit network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to scale up. Go to podcastinit.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute.
  • Visit the site to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, and read the show notes. And if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions I would love to hear them. You can reach me on Twitter at @Podcast__init__ or email [email protected])
  • To help other people find the show please leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, tell your friends and co-workers, and share it on social media.
  • Join the community in the new Zulip chat workspace at podcastinit.com/chat
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Maricela Sanchez Miranda about her work in organizing PyCon Charlas, the spanish language track at PyCon US, as well as Python Day Mexico

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • Can you briefly describe PyCon Charlas and Python Day Mexico?
    • What has been your motivation for getting involved with organizing these community events?
  • What do you find to be the unique characteristics of the Python community in Mexico?
  • What kind of feedback have you gotton from the Charlas track at PyCon?
  • What are your goals for fostering these Spanish language events?
  • What are some of the lessons that you have learned from PyCon Charlas that were useful in organizing Python Day Mexico?
  • What have been the most challenging or complicated aspects of organizing Python Day Mexico?
    • How many attendees do you anticipate? How has that affected your planning and preparation?
  • Are there any aspects of the geography, infrastructure, or culture of Mexico that you have found to be either beneficial or challenging for organizing a conference?
  • Do you anticipate PyCon Charlas and Python Day Mexico becoming annual events?
  • What is your advice for anyone who is interested in organizing a conference in their own region or language?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Bringing Africa Online At Ascoderu with Clemens Wolff - Episode 167

Summary

The future is here, it’s just not evenly distributed. One of the places where this is especially true is in sub-Saharan Africa which is a vast region with little to no reliable internet connectivity. To help communities in this region leapfrog infrastructure challenges and gain access to opportunities for education and market information the Ascoderu non-profit has built Lokole. In this episode one of the lead engineers on the project, Clemens Wolff, explains what it is, how it is built, and how the venerable e-mail protocols can continue to provide access cheaply and reliably.

Preface

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next app you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so check out Linode. With private networking, shared block storage, node balancers, and a 200Gbit network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to scale up. Go to podcastinit.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute.
  • To get worry-free releases download GoCD, the open source continous delivery server built by Thoughworks. You can use their pipeline modeling and value stream map to build, control and monitor every step from commit to deployment in one place. And with their new Kubernetes integration it’s even easier to deploy and scale your build agents. Go to podcastinit.com/gocd to learn more about their professional support services and enterprise add-ons.
  • Visit the site to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, and read the show notes. And if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions I would love to hear them. You can reach me on Twitter at @Podcast__init__ or email [email protected])
  • To help other people find the show please leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, tell your friends and co-workers, and share it on social media.
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Clemens Wolff about how Ascoderu is using Python to help communities in sub-Saharan Africa gain access to the digital age

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • What is the mission of Ascoderu and how did the organization get started?
    • How did you get involved?
  • The primary project that you build and maintain is Lokole. What is it and how does it help you in achieving the goals of the organization?
    • What are the limitations of using e-mail as the only interface to the broader internet?
    • What are some of the most interesting or unexpected uses of email in isolation have you seen?
  • From the user perspective, can you describe the overall experience of interacting with Lokole?
    • What is happening in the background?
    • Did you consider using a binary message format such as Avro, protocol buffers, or msgpack in place of JSON?
  • What kind of fault tolerance techniques are built into the overall information flow?
  • What are the most challenging or unexpected aspects of building Lokole and interacting with the user communities?
  • What projects do you have planned for the future?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Building And Growing Nylas with Christine Spang - Episode 156

Summary

Email is one of the oldest methods of communication that is still in use on the internet today. Despite many attempts at building a replacement and predictions of its demise we are sending more email now than ever. Recognizing that the venerable inbox is still an important repository of information, Christine Spang co-founded Nylas to integrate your mail with the rest of your tools, rather than just replacing it. In this episode Christine discusses how Nylas is built, how it is being used, and how she has helped to grow a successful business with a strong focus on diversity and inclusion.

Preface

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next app you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so check out Linode. With private networking, shared block storage, node balancers, and a 200Gbit network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to scale up. Go to podcastinit.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute.
  • Finding a bug in production is never a fun experience, especially when your users find it first. Airbrake error monitoring ensures that you will always be the first to know so you can deploy a fix before anyone is impacted. With open source agents for Python 2 and 3 it’s easy to get started, and the automatic aggregations, contextual information, and deployment tracking ensure that you don’t waste time pinpointing what went wrong. Go to podcastinit.com/airbrake today to sign up and get your first 30 days free, and 50% off 3 months of the Startup plan.
  • To get worry-free releases download GoCD, the open source continous delivery server built by Thoughworks. You can use their pipeline modeling and value stream map to build, control and monitor every step from commit to deployment in one place. And with their new Kubernetes integration it’s even easier to deploy and scale your build agents. Go to podcastinit.com/gocd to learn more about their professional support services and enterprise add-ons.
  • Visit the site to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, and read the show notes. And if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions I would love to hear them. You can reach me on Twitter at @Podcast__init__ or email [email protected])
  • To help other people find the show please leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, tell your friends and co-workers, and share it on social media.
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Christine Spang about Nylas and the modern era of email

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • Can you explain what Nylas is and some of its history?
  • What do you think it is about email as a protocol and a means of communication that has made it so resilient in the face of technological evolution?
  • What lessons did you learn from your initial offering of the N1 mail client and how has that informed your current focus?
  • Nylas as a company appears to have a strong focus on diversity and inclusion. Can you speak to how you encourage that type of environment and how it manifests at work?
  • What are some of the ways that Python is used at Nylas?
  • Can you share some examples of services that you have written in other languages and why you felt that Python was not the right choice?
  • What are some of the use cases that Nylas enables?
  • What are some of the most interesting or innovative uses of the Nylas platform that you have seen?
  • How do you manage privacy and security in your sync service given the sensitivity of the data that you are handling?
  • What are some of the biggest challenges that you are currently facing at Nylas?
  • What do you think will be the future of email?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

ZimboPy - Episode 148

Summary

Learning to code is one of the most effective ways to be successful in the modern economy. To that end, Marlene Mhangami and Ronald Maravanyika created the ZimboPy organization to teach women and girls in Zimbabwe how to program in Python. In this episode they are joined by Mike Place to discuss how ZimboPy got started, the projects that their students have worked on, and how the community can get involved.

Preface

mu- Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
– I would like to thank everyone who supports us on Patreon. Your contributions help to make the show sustainable.
– When you’re ready to launch your next project you’ll need somewhere to deploy it. Check out Linode at podastinit.com/linode and get a $20 credit to try out their fast and reliable Linux virtual servers for running your awesome app. And now you can deliver your work to your users even faster with the newly upgraded 200 GBit network in all of their datacenters.
– If you’re tired of cobbling together your deployment pipeline then it’s time to try out GoCD, the open source continuous delivery platform built by the people at ThoughtWorks who wrote the book about it. With GoCD you get complete visibility into the life-cycle of your software from one location. To download it now go to podcatinit.com/gocd. Professional support and enterprise plugins are available for added piece of mind.
– Visit the site to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, and read the show notes. And if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions I would love to hear them. You can reach me on Twitter at @Podcast__init__ or email [email protected])
– To help other people find the show please leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, tell your friends and co-workers, and share it on social media.
– Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Marlene Mhangami, Mike Place, and Ronald Maravanyika about ZimboPy, an organization that teaches women and girls in Zimbabwe how to program using Python

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • Can you start by explaining what the mission of ZimboPy is and how it got started?
  • Which languages did you consider using for your lessons and what was your reason for choosing Python?
  • What subject matter do you cover in addition to pure programming concepts?
  • What are some of the types of projects that the students have completed as part of their work with ZimboPy?
  • What have been the most challenging aspects of running ZimboPy?
  • How is ZimboPy supported and what are your plans to ensure future sustainability?
  • Can you share some success stories for the women and girls that you have worked with?
  • For anyone who is interested in replicating your work for other communities what advice do you have?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Annapoornima Koppad - Episode 81

Summary

Annapoornima Koppad is a director of the PSF, founder of the Bangalore chapter of PyLadies, and is a Python instructor at the Indian Institute of Science. In this week’s episode she talks about how she got started with Python, her experience running the PyLadies meetup, and working with the PSF.

Brief Introduction

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • I would like to thank everyone who has donated to the show. Your contributions help us make the show sustainable.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next project you’ll need somewhere to deploy it. Check out Linode at linode.com/podcastinit and get a $20 credit to try out their fast and reliable Linux virtual servers for running your awesome app.
  • You’ll want to make sure that your users don’t have to put up with bugs, so you should use Rollbar for tracking and aggregating your application errors to find and fix the bugs in your application before your users notice they exist. Use the link rollbar.com/podcastinit to get 90 days and 300,000 errors for free on their bootstrap plan.
  • Visit our site to subscribe to our show, sign up for our newsletter, read the show notes, and get in touch.
  • To help other people find the show you can leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, and tell your friends and co-workers
  • Join our community! Visit discourse.pythonpodcast.com for your opportunity to find out about upcoming guests, suggest questions, and propose show ideas.
  • Your hosts as usual are Tobias Macey and Chris Patti
  • Today we’re interviewing Annapoornima Koppad about her career with Python and her experiences running the PyLadies chapter in Bangalore, India and being a director for the Python Software Foundation.

Interview with Annapoornima Koppad

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python? – Tobias
  • I noticed that you have been freelancing for several years now. How much of that has been in Python and how has that fed back into your other activities? – Tobias
  • While preparing for this interview I came across the book that you self-published on Amazon. What was your motivation for writing it and who is the target audience? – Tobias
  • Can you tell us about your experience with starting the PyLadies group in Bangalore? What were some of the biggest challenges that you encountered and how have you approached the task of growing awareness and membership of the group? – Tobias
  • You recently started teaching Python at the Indian Institute of Science. What kinds of subject matter do you cover in your lessons? – Tobias
  • What is it about Python and its community that has inspired you to dedicate so much of your time to contributing back to it? – Tobias
  • In what ways would you like to see the Python ecosystem improve? – Tobias
  • You were voted in as a director of the Python Software Foundation in the most recent election. Can you share what responsibilities that entails? – Tobias
  • What would you like to achieve with your time in the PSF? – Tobias

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Lorena Mesa - Episode 78

Summary

One of the great strengths of the Python community is the diversity of backgrounds that our practitioners come from. This week Lorena Mesa talks about how her focus on political science and civic engagement led her to a career in software engineering and data analysis. In addition to her professional career she founded the Chicago chapter of PyLadies, helps teach women and kids how to program, and was voted onto the board of the PSF.

Brief Introduction

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • I would like to thank everyone who has donated to the show. Your contributions help us make the show sustainable.
  • Check out our sponsor Linode for running your awesome new Python apps. Check them out at linode.com/podcastinit and get a $20 credit to try out their fast and reliable Linux virtual servers for your next project
  • You want to make sure your apps are error-free so give our other sponsor, Rollbar, a look. Rollbar is a service for tracking and aggregating your application errors so that you can find and fix the bugs in your application before your users notice they exist. Use the link rollbar.com/podcastinit to get 90 days and 300,000 errors for free on their bootstrap plan.
  • Visit our site to subscribe to our show, sign up for our newsletter, read the show notes, and get in touch.
  • By leaving a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music it becomes easier for other people to find us.
  • Join our community! Visit discourse.pythonpodcast.com to help us grow and connect our wonderful audience.
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey
  • Today we’re interviewing Lorena Mesa about what inspires her in her work as a software engineer and data analyst.

Interview with Lorena Mesa

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • How did your original interests in political science and community outreach lead to your current role as a software engineer?
  • You dedicate a lot of your time to organizations that help teach programming to women and kids. What are some of the most meaningful experiences that you have been able to facilitate?
  • Can you talk a bit about your work getting the PyLadies chapter in Chicago off the ground and what the reaction has been like?
  • Now that you are a member of the board for the PSF, what are your goals in that position?
  • What is it about software development that made you want to change your career path?
  • What are some of the most interesting projects that you have worked on, whether for your employer or for fun?
  • Do you think that the bootcamp you attended did a good job of preparing you for a position in industry?
  • What is your view on the concept that software development is the modern form of literacy? Do you think that everyone should learn how to program?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

PyCon Canada with Francis Deslauriers and Peter McCormick - Episode 69

Summary

Aside from the national Python conferences such as PyCon US and EuroPyCon there are a number of regional conferences that operate at a smaller scale to service their local communities. This week we interviewed Peter McCormick and Francis Deslauriers about their work organizing PyCon Canada to provide a venue for Canadians to talk about how they are using the language. If you happen to be near Toronto in November then you should get a ticket and help contribute to their success!

Brief Introduction

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • I would like to thank everyone who has donated to the show. Your contributions help us make the show sustainable. For details on how to support the show you can visit our site at pythonpodcast.com
  • Linode is sponsoring us this week. Check them out at linode.com/podcastinit and get a $20 credit to try out their fast and reliable Linux virtual servers for your next project
  • We are also sponsored by Sentry this week. Stop hoping your users will report bugs. Sentry’s real-time tracking gives you insight into production deployments and information to reproduce and fix crashes. Check them out at getsentry.com and use the code podcastinit at signup to get a $50 credit!
  • Hired has also returned as a sponsor this week. If you’re looking for a job as a developer or designer then Hired will bring the opportunities to you. Sign up at hired.com/podcastinit to double your signing bonus.
  • Visit our site to subscribe to our show, sign up for our newsletter, read the show notes, and get in touch.
  • To help other people find the show you can leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, and tell your friends and co-workers
  • Join our community! Visit discourse.pythonpodcast.com for your opportunity to find out about upcoming guests, suggest questions, and propose show ideas.
  • Your hosts as usual are Tobias Macey and Chris Patti
  • Today we’re interviewing Peter McCormick and Francis Deslauriers about their experiences organizing PyCon Canada

Interview with Peter McCormick and Francis Deslauriers

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python? – Chris
  • How did you get involved as an organizer of PyCon Canada? – Tobias
  • How does PyCon Canada, and other regional conferences, differ from PyCon US, both in terms of scale and overall experience? – Tobias
  • How do the audience and presenters differ from the US conferences? Is there perhaps a differen mix of industry versus academia, or maybe different disciplines? Chris
  • Are you thinking of trying to hold the conference in different cities across Canada, similarly to how PyCon US moves venues every two years? – Tobias
  • In addition to the national and regional conferences, there are a number of special interest Python conferences that take place (e.g. SciPy, PyData, etc.). What kind of relationship do you have with organizers of those events and how do they impact the kinds of talk submissions that you are likely to receive? – Tobias
  • There has been a lot of focus in recent years on trying to increase the diversity of conference speakers. What are some of the methods that you have used to encourage speakers of various backgrounds to submit talks? – Tobias
  • Organizing a conference involves a lot of moving parts. How do you structure the process to ensure a safe and enjoyable experience for the attendees? – Tobias
  • What are some of the biggest logistical challenges you face as conference organizers? – Chris
  • Given that PyCon Canada is a regional conference, how has that affected your focus in terms of marketing and the general theme? – Tobias
  • Tell our listeners about your favorite PyCon Canada moments. – Chris
  • What has been the most surprising part of organizing the conference? – Tobias

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Jessica McKellar - Episode 21

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Summary

We got the chance to talk to Jessica McKellar about her work in the Python community. She told us about her experience as a director for the PSF, working as the diversity outreach manager for PyCon, and being a champion for improving the on-boarding experience for new users of Python. We also discussed perceptions around the performance of Python and some of the work being done to improve concurrency, as well as her work with OpenHatch.

Brief Introduction

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • Subscribe on iTunes, Stitcher, TuneIn or RSS
  • Follow us on Twitter or Google+
  • Give us feedback! Leave a review on iTunes, Tweet to us, send us an email or leave us a message on Google+
  • I would like to thank everyone who has donated to the show. Your contributions help us make the show sustainable. For details on how to support the show you can visit our site at
  • We are recording today on Aug, 12 2015 and your hosts as usual are Tobias Macey and Chris Patti
  • Today we are interviewing Jessica McKellar

Interview with Jessica McKellar

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
    • Attended MIT, originally for Chemistry
    • Had friends pursuing CS degrees
    • Toolset and skills seemed worth investingating
    • Led to BA and MS
    • MIT was in transition from LISP to Python
  • Can you describe what your responsibilities are as a director of the PSF?
    • A lot of outreach and investment in the community
  • Do you think the PSF does a good job of making people aware of what it is, what it does for the community, and how they can help?
    • Struggled with this historically but has gotten better in recent years
    • Website re-design has helped
  • A large focus of your work in the community has been around improving the experience of users who are new to Python and programming in general and I noticed that you just received the Frank Willison Memorial Award for your contributions to outreach and education in the Python community. What is your motivation behind this particular focus?
    • Great deal of empathy for newcomers due to personal history
    • Knowing how to program changes how you think about the world
  • Has the situation for newcomers running Windows who wish to try Python gotten any better since your keynote at Kiwi PyCon?
    • Some vaguaries of setup have gotten better with recent versions (e.g. setting path variables)
    • Ruby has in-browser tutorial to get people hooked
  • Do “Batteries Included’ distributions like Anaconda help or is it the same problem of visibility you discussed in your talk?
    • Informatino flow / what are you default options question
    • We could be much more opinionated about this
  • You have presented a number of times about the future of Python and how we can all help to make sure that story is a happy one. How has the material for that talk changed over the past few years?
    • As a largely volunteer community, how to maximize the impact of the bandwidth that we have
    • Focus on the ‘top of the funnel’ to win over new users
    • Python has the steepest positive curve of any language
    • Community should invest in AP high school Python curriculum
  • What do you anticipate will be the talking points for this topic over the next few years?
    • We need to be smart about which areas we invest in to ensure success e.g. mobile, web, desktop.
  • If you could grade the Python community on how well they have listened to and acted on the calls to action in your talks over the past few years, what would you give them?
    • Rallying large groups of volunteers is a hard problem
    • We need to think about commercial partnerships in key areas
  • In your Kiwi PyCon talk you mentioned Kivy as an example of a great way to do mobile software development in Python. It feels to me like the Kivy team are still not getting the community involvement and buy in they should. How can we help make Kivy the mobile app development platform of choice for beginners?
    • This will be a tough battle because Python is not the default platform for mobile compared to Java for Android, Objective C, Swift
    • Users vote with their feet depending on what provides the most value to them
    • Opportunity for a virtuous cycle here
  • Game development as an entree to programming has been a recurring theme on our podcast. Has the Python game dev scene improved at all since 2013? And do you still see the same pitfalls holding people back (like app packaging), or have we moved on to different problems?
    • The problems are largely the same
    • Status quo still feels pretty broken
    • Creative experiments around this definitely make sense for the community
    • KivEnt could be a win here because Kivy apps are free standing binaries and require no dependencies.
  • What do you view as the biggest threats to the popularity of Python currently and what can we do to address them?
    • Other languages gaining popularity where Python has historically been strong (e.g. server-side development)
    • A lot of this may be a perception issue
    • May be largely a marketing problem
  • I understand that you were involved in the formation of the Open Hatch organization. Can you describe what Open Hatch does and how our listeners can get involved?
    • Non-profit dedicated to lowering barriers to entry for open source contribution
    • Host workshops in colleges, underserved communities, etc.

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Conference Presentations

Al Sweigart on Python for Non-Programmers - Episode 19

Visit our site to listen to past episodes, learn more about us, and support the show.

Summary

We got the opportunity to speak with Al Sweigart about his work on books like ‘Automate The Boring Stuff With Python’ and ‘Invent With Python’. We discussed how Python can be useful to people who don’t work as software engineers, why coding literacy is important for the general populace and how that will affect the ways in which we interact with software.

Brief Introduction

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • Subscribe on iTunes, Stitcher, TuneIn or RSS
  • Follow us on Twitter or Google+
  • Give us feedback! Leave a review on iTunes, Tweet to us, send us an email or leave us a message on Google+
  • I would like to thank everyone who has donated to the show. Your contributions help us make the show sustainable. For details on how to support the show you can visit our site at
  • We are recording today on July 27th, 2015 and your hosts as usual are Tobias Macey and Chris Patti
  • Today we are interviewing Al Sweigart about Python for non-programmers

Interview with Al Sweigert

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
    • Started in PHP/Perl, introduced to Python in 2006
    • Lack of curly braces took some getting used to
    • Clarity of standard library was refreshing
  • What inspired you to start writing books for non-programmers?
    • Friend who took care of 10 year old interested in programming
    • Lack of coherent introductory material
    • Started writing a tutorial which grew to book length
    • All books published under Creative Commons license
  • You have written a few books about teaching Python to people who have never programmed, can you share your thoughts on the best order in which to introduce the various aspects of programming?
  • Where does software testing come in when teaching new coders how to program?
    • Use the logger, debugger, and assertions effectively
  • In invent with Python you use games as the vehicle to discuss the principles involved with writing code. What is it about computer games that makes them so popular as a means to introduce programming to newcomers?
    • Something everyone is familiar with
    • Easy to make a simple game to get started
    • Good way to get creative with programming
  • For automate the boring stuff with Python you focused on explaining how programming can be useful even if it is not someone’s occupation. How did you determine which kinds of activities to focus on for the book?
    • Got the idea at a meetup talking to someone who works in an office doing repetitive tasks
    • A lot of office jobs that involve tedious computer work which could be automated
  • What are your thoughts on the need for software literacy among the general population?
    • How much programming knowledge do you think is sufficient for a member of our modern society?
  • You also wrote about using Python to decrypt simple ciphers as a means to learn about code. What was the inspiration for this approach to software education?
    • One of the projects in invent with Python was a simple cypher, inspired further interest in the subject
  • In episode 7 with Jacob Kaplan-Moss we talked about how we define what a programmer is. Can you share your opinions on what separates someone who can understand code from someone who is a programmer?
    • Barriers to entry have been significantly lowered, making the distinction very fuzzy
    • Definition of programmer is becoming much wider
  • Books available at:

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Naomi Ceder, Lynn Root and Tracy Osborn on Diversity in the Python Community - Episode 11

Listen to past episodes, read about the show and check out our donations section at podcastinit.com

Brief Introduction

  • Date of recording – Jun-10th, 2015
  • Hosts Macey and Chris Patti
  • Follow us on iTunes, Stitcher or TuneIn
  • Give us feedback! (iTunes, Twitter, email, Disqus comments)
  • You can donate (if you want)!
  • Overview – Interview with Tracy Osborn, Naomi Ceder, Lynn Root

Interview with Prominent PyLadies

  • Introductions
    • Tracy Osborn
    • Naomi Ceder
    • Lynn Root
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • In what ways do you think the Python community has succeeded in making itself more friendly and welcoming to women and other under represented minorities, and where could it do better?
    • Python community leadership takes a positive stance on diversity
    • Codes of conduct are taken very seriously
    • Financial diversity needs more focus
  • What can you tell us about PyLadies and DJango Girls?
    • PyLadies
      • started in a coffee shop in LA
      • pip install PyLadies
      • Over 70 locations on almost every continent – half on meetup.com
  • What are some of the challenges you still face in being a part of the Python community, and how can our listeners help?
    • Don’t be disparaging about women-focused events
  • I had to read up to page 17 of the top authors list on PyPi to find a woman. Can you provide some insight into what may be contributing to this state of affairs and how we can help to improve it?
    • pypi is confusing and intimidating
    • Process and tools are tough to use
    • Maybe Pyladies should host a “make your own package” night
    • Mentorship and easy HOWTOs are needed
  • You have all gained some notoriety in the Python community through work that you have done. Do you feel that you were faced with greater adversity than your peers in the course of your careers?
    • Startup community more hostile than Python community
  • We are talking to each of you because of your involvement in the Python community. Have you worked with and been involved in other language communities? If so, can you provide some comparisons between that and Python in how they manage the subject of diversity, gender and otherwise?
    • Design community – lots of conferences with “all dude” conference speaker line up
    • Startups very focused on males for employees and customers
  • What effect do you think job descriptions play in excluding women and other minorities from roles in development positions? (In reference to https://blog.safaribooksonline.com/2015/06/08/on-recruiting-inclusiveness-and-crafting-better-job-descriptions/)
    • Discourage more appropriate term than exclude
    • Women less likely to apply for roles that they are not completely qualified for
    • Spotify experimenting with blind resume review and cross-checking of job descriptions
      • Result is more women applying and having better results
  • For any women and young girls who may be considering a career in technology, do you have any words of advice?
    • Go for it, but be aware that it’s hard
  • Do you have any advice for the men in the Python community and technology as a whole?
    • Actually listen when somebody tells you that it’s not the same for them (race, economics, gender)
    • Have some compassion and empathy
    • Men should educate themselves
    • Old habits die hard but getting over them is important
  • Is there anything we haven’t discussed that any of you would like to bring up?

    Picks

  • Tobias
  • Chris
  • Naomi Ceder
  • Lynn Root
  • Tracy Osborn
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      Keep in Touch

  • Naomi Ceder
  • Lynn Root
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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA