Learning

Learning To Program In Python With CodeGrades - Episode 224

Summary

With the increasing role of software in our world there has been an accompanying focus on teaching people to program. There are numerous approaches that have been attempted to achieve this goal with varying levels of success. Nicholas Tollervey has begun a new effort that blends the approach adopted by musicians and martial artists that uses a series of grades to provide recognition for the achievements of students. In this episode he explains how he has structured the study groups, syllabus, and evaluations to help learners build projects based on their interests and guide their own education while incorporating useful skills that are necessary for a career in software. If you are interested in learning to program, teach others, or act as a mentor then give this a listen and then get in touch with Nicholas to help make this endeavor a success.

Announcements

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next app or want to try a project you hear about on the show, you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so take a look at our friends over at Linode. With 200 Gbit/s private networking, scalable shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40 Gbit/s public network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to scale up. And for your tasks that need fast computation, such as training machine learning models, they just launched dedicated CPU instances. Go to pythonpodcast.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute. And don’t forget to thank them for their continued support of this show!
  • You listen to this show to learn and stay up to date with the ways that Python is being used, including the latest in machine learning and data analysis. For even more opportunities to meet, listen, and learn from your peers you don’t want to miss out on this year’s conference season. We have partnered with organizations such as O’Reilly Media, Dataversity, Corinium Global Intelligence. Coming up this fall is the combined events of Graphorum and the Data Architecture Summit. The agendas have been announced and super early bird registration for up to $300 off is available until July 26th, with early bird pricing for up to $200 off through August 30th. Use the code BNLLC to get an additional 10% off any pass when you register. Go to pythonpodcast.com/conferences to learn more and take advantage of our partner discounts when you register.
  • Visit the site to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, and read the show notes. And if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions I would love to hear them. You can reach me on Twitter at @Podcast__init__ or email [email protected])
  • To help other people find the show please leave a review on iTunes and tell your friends and co-workers
  • Join the community in the new Zulip chat workspace at pythonpodcast.com/chat
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today Nicholas Tollervey is back to talk about his work on CodeGrades, a new effort that he is building to blend his backgrounds in music, education, and software to help teach kids of all ages how to program.

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • Can you start by describing what CodeGrades is and what motivated you to start this project?
    • How does it differ from other approaches to teaching software development that you have encountered?
    • Is there a particular age or level of background knowledge that you are targeting with the curriculum that you are developing?
  • What are the criteria that you are measuring against and how does that criteria change as you progress in grade levels?
  • For someone who completes the full set of levels, what level of capability would you expect them to have as a developer?
  • Given your affiliation with the Python community it is understandable that you would target that language initially. What would be involved in adapting the curriculum, mentorship, and assessments to other languages?
    • In what other ways can this idea and platform be adapted to accomodate other engineering skills? (e.g. system administration, statistics, graphic design, etc.)
  • What interesting/exciting/unexpected outcomes and lessons have you found while iterating on this idea?
  • For engineers who would like to be involved in the CodeGrades platform, how can they contribute?
  • What challenges do you anticipate as you continue to develop the curriculum and mentor networks?
  • How do you envision the future of CodeGrades taking ship in the medium to long term?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Hardware Hacking Made Easy With CircuitPython - Episode 212

Summary

Learning to program can be a frustrating process, because even the simplest code relies on a complex stack of other moving pieces to function. When working with a microcontroller you are in full control of everything so there are fewer concepts that need to be understood in order to build a functioning project. CircuitPython is a platform for beginner developers that provides easy to use abstractions for working with hardware devices. In this episode Scott Shawcroft explains how the project got started, how it relates to MicroPython, some of the cool ways that it is being used, and how you can get started with it today. If you are interested in playing with low cost devices without having to learn and use C then give this a listen and start tinkering!

Announcements

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next app or want to try a project you hear about on the show, you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so take a look at our friends over at Linode. With 200 Gbit/s private networking, scalable shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40 Gbit/s public network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to scale up. And for your tasks that need fast computation, such as training machine learning models, they just launched dedicated CPU instances. Go to pythonpodcast.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute. And don’t forget to thank them for their continued support of this show!
  • You listen to this show to learn and stay up to date with the ways that Python is being used, including the latest in machine learning and data analysis. For even more opportunities to meet, listen, and learn from your peers you don’t want to miss out on this year’s conference season. We have partnered with organizations such as O’Reilly Media, Dataversity, and the Open Data Science Conference. Go to pythonpodcast.com/conferences to learn more and take advantage of our partner discounts when you register.
  • Visit the site to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, and read the show notes. And if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions I would love to hear them. You can reach me on Twitter at @Podcast__init__ or email [email protected])
  • To help other people find the show please leave a review on iTunes and tell your friends and co-workers
  • Join the community in the new Zulip chat workspace at pythonpodcast.com/chat
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Scott Shawcroft about CircuitPython, the easiest way to program microcontrollers

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • Can you start by explaining what CircuitPython is and how the project got started?
    • I understand that you work at Adafruit and I know that a number of their products support CircuitPython. What other runtimes do you support?
  • Microcontrollers have typically been the domain of C because of the resource and performance constraints. What are the benefits of using Python to program hardware devices?
  • With the wide availability of powerful computing platforms, what are the benefits of experimenting with microcontrollers and their peripherals?
  • I understand that CircuitPython is a friendly fork of MicroPython. What have you changed in your version?
    • How do you structure your development to avoid conflicts with the upstream project?
    • What are some changes that you have contributed back to MicroPython?
  • What are some of the features of CircuitPython that make it easier for users to interact with sensors, motors, etc.?
  • CircuitPython provides an easy on-ramp for experimenting with hardware projects. Is there a point where a user will outgrow it and need to move to a different language or framework?
  • What are some of the most interesting/innovative/unexpected projects that you have seen people build using CircuitPython?
    • Are there any cases of someone building and shipping a production grade project in CircuitPython?
  • What have been some of the most interesting/challenging/unexpected aspects of building and maintaining CircuitPython?
  • What is in store for the future of the project?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Teaching Digital Archaeology With Jupyter Notebooks - Episode 194

Summary

Computers have found their way into virtually every area of human endeavor, and archaeology is no exception. To aid his students in their exploration of digital archaeology Shawn Graham helped to create an online, digital textbook with accompanying interactive notebooks. In this episode he explains how computational practices are being applied to archaeological research, how the Online Digital Archaeology Textbook was created, and how you can use it to get involved in this fascinating area of research.

Introduction

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next app or want to try a project you hear about on the show, you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so take a look at our friends over at Linode. With 200 Gbit/s private networking, scalable shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40 Gbit/s public network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to scale up. Go to pythonpodcast.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute. And don’t forget to thank them for their continued support of this show!
  • And to keep track of how your team is progressing on building new features and squashing bugs, you need a project management system designed by software engineers, for software engineers. Clubhouse lets you craft a workflow that fits your style, including per-team tasks, cross-project epics, a large suite of pre-built integrations, and a simple API for crafting your own. Podcast.__init__ listeners get 2 months free on any plan by going to pythonpodcast.com/clubhouse today and signing up for a trial.
  • Visit the site to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, and read the show notes. And if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions I would love to hear them. You can reach me on Twitter at @Podcast__init__ or email [email protected])
  • To help other people find the show please leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, tell your friends and co-workers, and share it on social media.
  • Join the community in the new Zulip chat workspace at pythonpodcast.com/chat
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Shawn Graham about his work on the Online Digital Archaeology Textbook

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • Can you start by explaining what digital archaeology is?
  • To facilitate your teaching you have collaborated on the O-DATE textbook and associated Jupyter notebooks. Can you describe what that resource covers and how the project got started?
  • What have you found to be the most critical lessons for your students to help them be effective archaeologists?
    • What are the most useful aspects of leveraging computational techniques in an archaeological context?
  • Can you describe some of the sources and formats of data that would commonly be encountered by digital archaeologists?
  • The notebooks that accompany the text have a mixture of R and Python code. What are your personal guidelines for when to use each language?
  • How have the skills and tools of software engineering influenced your views and approach to research and education in the realm of archaeology?
  • What are some of the most novel or engaging ways that you have seen computers applied to the field of archaeology?
  • What are your goals and aspirations for the O-DATE project?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Keeping Up With The Python Community For Fun And Profit with Dan Bader - Episode 188

Summary

Keeping up with the work being done in the Python community can be a full time job, which is why Dan Bader has made it his! In this episode he discusses how he went from working as a software engineer, to offering training, to now managing both the Real Python and PyCoders properties. He also explains his strategies for tracking and curating the content that he produces and discovers, how he thinks about building products, and what he has learned in the process of running his businesses.

Preface

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next app or want to try a project you hear about on the show, you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so check out Linode. With 200 Gbit/s private networking, scalable shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40 Gbit/s public network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to scale up. Go to podcastinit.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute.
  • Visit the site to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, and read the show notes. And if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions I would love to hear them. You can reach me on Twitter at @Podcast__init__ or email [email protected])
  • To help other people find the show please leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, tell your friends and co-workers, and share it on social media.
  • Join the community in the new Zulip chat workspace at podcastinit.com/chat
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Dan Bader about finding, filtering, and creating resources for Python developers at Real Python, PyCoders, and his own trainings

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • Let’s start by discussing your primary job these days and how you got to where you are.
    • In the past year you have also taken over management of the Real Python site. How did that come about and what are your responsibilities?
    • You just recently took over management of the PyCoders newsletter and website. Can you describe the events that led to that outcome and the responsibilities that came along with it?
  • What are the synergies that exist between your various roles and projects?
    • What are the areas of conflict? (e.g. time constraints, conflicts of interest, etc.)
  • Between PyCoders, Real Python, your training materials, your Python tips newsletter, and your coaching you have a lot of incentive to keep up to date with everything happening in the Python ecosystem. What are your strategies for content discovery?
    • With the diversity in use cases, geography, and contributors to the landscape of Python how do you work to counteract any bias or blindspots in your work?
  • There is a constant stream of information about any number of topics and subtopics that involve the Python language and community. What is your process for filtering and curating the resources that are ultimately included in the various media properties that you oversee?
  • In my experience with the podcast one of the most difficult aspects of maintaining relevance as a content creator is obtaining feedback from your audience. What do you do to foster engagement and facilitate conversations around the work that you do?
  • You have also built a few different product offerings. Can you discuss the process involved in identifying the relevant opportunities and the creation and marketing of them?
  • Creating, collecting, and curating content takes a significant investment of time and energy. What are your avenues for ensuring the sustainability of your various projects?
  • What are your plans for the future growth and development of your media empire?
  • As someone who is so deeply involved in the conversations flowing through and around Python, what do you see as being the greatest threats and opportunities for the language and its community?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Building A Game In Python At PyWeek with Daniel Pope - Episode 182

Summary

Many people learn to program because of their interest in building their own video games. Once the necessary skills have been acquired, it is often the case that the original idea of creating a game is forgotten in favor of solving the problems we confront at work. Game jams are a great way to get inspired and motivated to finally write a game from scratch. This week Daniel Pope discusses the origin and format for PyWeek, his experience as a participant, and the landscape of options for building a game in Python. He also explains how you can register and compete in the next competition.

Preface

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next app you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so check out Linode. With private networking, shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40Gbit network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to scale up. Go to podcastinit.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute.
  • Visit the site to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, and read the show notes. And if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions I would love to hear them. You can reach me on Twitter at @Podcast__init__ or email [email protected])
  • To help other people find the show please leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, tell your friends and co-workers, and share it on social media.
  • Join the community in the new Zulip chat workspace at podcastinit.com/chat
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Daniel Pope about PyWeek, a one week challenge to build a game in Python

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • Can you start by describing what PyWeek is and how the competition got started?
    • What is your current role in relation to PyWeek and how did you get involved?
  • What are the strengths of the Python lanaguage and ecosystem for developing a game?
  • What are some of the common difficulties encountered by participants in the challenge?
  • What are some of the most commonly used libraries and tools for creating and packaging the games?
  • What are some shortcomings in the available tools or libraries for Python when it comes to game development?
  • What are some examples of libraries or tools that were created and released as a result of a team’s efforts during PyWeek?
  • How often do games that get started during PyWeek continue to be developed and improved?
    • Have there ever been games that went on to be commercially viable?
  • What are some of the most interesting or unusual games that you have seen submitted to PyWeek?
  • Can you describe your experience as a competitor in PyWeek?
    • How do you structure your time during the competition week to ensure that you can complete your game?
  • What are the benefits and difficulties of the one week constraint for development?
  • How has PyWeek changed over the years that you have been involved with it?
  • What are your hopes for the competition as it continues into the future?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

The Business Of Technical Authoring With William Vincent - Episode 179

Summary

There are many aspects of learning how to program and at least as many ways to go about it. This is multiplicative with the different problem domains and subject areas where software development is applied. In this episode William Vincent discusses his experiences learning how web development mid-career and then writing a series of books to make the learning curve for Django newcomers shallower. This includes his thoughts on the business aspects of technical writing and teaching, the challenges of keeping content up to date with the current state of software, and the ever-present lack of sufficient information for new programmers.

Preface

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next app you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so check out Linode. With private networking, shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40Gbit network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to scale up. Go to podcastinit.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute.
  • Visit the site to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, and read the show notes. And if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions I would love to hear them. You can reach me on Twitter at @Podcast__init__ or email [email protected])
  • To help other people find the show please leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, tell your friends and co-workers, and share it on social media.
  • Join the community in the new Zulip chat workspace at podcastinit.com/chat
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing William Vincent about his experience learning to code mid-career and then writing a series of books to bring you along on his journey from beginner to advanced Django developer

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • How has your experience as someone who began working as a developer mid-career influenced your approach to software?
  • How do you compare Python options for web development (Django/Flask) to others such as Ruby on Rails or Node/Express in the JavaScript world?
  • What was your motivation for writing a beginner guide to Django?
    • What was the most difficult aspect of determining the appropriate level of depth for the content?
    • At what point did you decide to publish the tutorial you were compiling as a book?
  • In the posts that you wrote about your experience authoring the books you give a detailed description of the economics of being an author. Can you discuss your thoughts on that?
    • Focusing on a library or framework, such as Django, increases the maintenance burden of a book, versus one that is written about fundamental principles of computing. What are your thoughts on the tradeoffs involved in selecting a topic for a technical book?
  • Challenges of creating useful intermediate content (lots of beginner tutorials and deep dives, not much in the middle)
  • After your initial foray into technical authoring you decided to follow it with two more books. What other topics are you covering with those?
    • Once you are finished with the third do you plan to continue writing, or will you shift your focus to something else?
  • Translating content to reach a larger audience
  • What advice would you give to someone who is considering writing a book of their own?
    • What alternative avenues do you think would be more valuable for themselves and their audience?
    • Alternative avenues for providing useful training to developers

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Don't Just Stand There, Get Programming! with Ana Bell - Episode 175

Summary

Writing a book is hard work, especially when you are trying to teach such a broad concept as programming. In this episode Ana Bell discusses her recent work in writing Get Programming: Learn To Code With Python, including her views on how to separate the principles from the implementation, making the book evergreen in its appeal, and how her experience as a lecturer at MIT has helped her maintain the perspectives of beginners. She also shares her views on the values of learning about programming, even when you have no intention of doing it as a career and ways to take the next steps if that is your goal.

Preface

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next app you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so check out Linode. With private networking, shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40Gbit network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to scale up. Go to podcastinit.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute.
  • As you know, Python has become one of the most popular programming languages in the world, due to the size, scope, and friendliness of the language and community. But, it can be tough learning it when you’re just starting out. Luckily, there’s an easy way to get involved. Written by MIT lecturer Ana Bell and published by Manning Publications, Get Programming: Learn to code with Python is the perfect way to get started working with Python. Ana’s experience as a teacher of Python really shines through, as you get hands-on with the language without being drowned in confusing jargon or theory. Filled with practical examples and step-by-step lessons to take on, Get Programming is perfect for people who just want to get stuck in with Python. Get your copy of the book with a special 40% discount for Podcast.__init__ listeners at podcastinit.com/get-programming using code: Bell40!
  • Visit the site to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, and read the show notes. And if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions I would love to hear them. You can reach me on Twitter at @Podcast__init__ or email [email protected])
  • To help other people find the show please leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, tell your friends and co-workers, and share it on social media.
  • Join the community in the new Zulip chat workspace at podcastinit.com/chat
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Ana Bell about her book, Get Programming: Learn to code with Python, and her approach to teaching how to code

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • Can you start by describing your motivation for writing a book about learning to program?
    • Who is the target audience for this book?
    • What level of competence do you want the reader to have when they have completed it?
  • What were the most challenging aspects of writing a book for beginning programmers?
    • What did you do to recapture the “beginner mind” while writing?
  • There are a large variety of books on learning to program and at least as many approaches. Can you describe the techniques that you use in your book to help readers grasp the concepts that you cover?
  • One of the problems of writing a book about technology is that there is no stationary target to aim for due to the constant advancement of the industry. How do you reconcile that reality with the need for a book to remain relevant for an extended period of time?
    • How do you decide what to include and what to leave out when writing about learning how to program?
  • What advice do you have for people who have read your book and want to continue on to a career in development?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Helping Teacher's Bring Python Into The Classroom With Nicholas Tollervey - Episode 173

Summary

There are a number of resources available for teaching beginners to code in Python and many other languages, and numerous endeavors to introduce programming to educational environments. Sometimes those efforts yield success and others can simply lead to frustration on the part of the teacher and the student. In this episode Nicholas Tollervey discusses his work as a teacher and a programmer, his work on the micro:bit project and the PyCon UK education summit, as well as his thoughts on the place that Python holds in educational programs for teaching the next generation.

Preface

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next app you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so check out Linode. With private networking, shared block storage, node balancers, and a 200Gbit network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to scale up. Go to podcastinit.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute.
  • Visit the site to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, and read the show notes. And if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions I would love to hear them. You can reach me on Twitter at @Podcast__init__ or email [email protected])
  • To help other people find the show please leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, tell your friends and co-workers, and share it on social media.
  • Join the community in the new Zulip chat workspace at podcastinit.com/chat
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Nicholas Tollervey about his efforts to improve the accessibility of Python for educators

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • How has your experience as a teacher influenced your work as a software engineer?
  • What are some of the ways that practicing software engineers can be most effective in supporting the efforts teachers and students to become computationally literate?
    • What are your views on the reasons that computational literacy is important for students?
  • What are some of the most difficult barriers that need to be overcome for students to engage with Python?
    • How important is it, in your opinion, to expose students to text-based programming, as opposed to the block-based environment of tools such as Scratch?
    • At what age range do you think we should be trying to engage students with programming?
  • When the teacher’s day was introduced as part of the education summit for PyCon UK what was the initial reception from the educators who attended?
    • How has the format for the teacher’s portion of the conference changed in the subsequent years?
    • What have been some of the most useful or beneficial aspects for the teacher’s and how much engagement occurs between the conferences?
  • What was your involvement in the initiative that brought the BBC micro:bit to UK classrooms?
    • What kinds of feedback have you gotten from students who have had an opportunity to use them?
    • What are some of the most interesting or unexpected uses of the micro:bit that you have seen?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Understanding Machine Learning Through Visualizations with Benjamin Bengfort and Rebecca Bilbro - Episode 166

Summary

Machine learning models are often inscrutable and it can be difficult to know whether you are making progress. To improve feedback and speed up iteration cycles Benjamin Bengfort and Rebecca Bilbro built Yellowbrick to easily generate visualizations of model performance. In this episode they explain how to use Yellowbrick in the process of building a machine learning project, how it aids in understanding how different parameters impact the outcome, and the improved understanding among teammates that it creates. They also explain how it integrates with the scikit-learn API, the difficulty of producing effective visualizations, and future plans for improvement and new features.

Preface

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next app you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so check out Linode. With private networking, shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40Gbit network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to scale up. Go to podcastinit.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute.
  • To get worry-free releases download GoCD, the open source continous delivery server built by Thoughworks. You can use their pipeline modeling and value stream map to build, control and monitor every step from commit to deployment in one place. And with their new Kubernetes integration it’s even easier to deploy and scale your build agents. Go to podcastinit.com/gocd to learn more about their professional support services and enterprise add-ons.
  • Visit the site to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, and read the show notes. And if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions I would love to hear them. You can reach me on Twitter at @Podcast__init__ or email [email protected])
  • To help other people find the show please leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, tell your friends and co-workers, and share it on social media.
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Rebecca Bilbro and Benjamin Bengfort about Yellowbrick, a scikit extension to use visualizations for assisting with model selection in your data science projects.

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • Can you describe the use case for Yellowbrick and how the project got started?
  • What is involved in visualizing scikit-learn models?
    • What kinds of information do the visualizations convey?
    • How do they aid in understanding what is happening in the models?
  • How much direction does yellowbrick provide in terms of knowing which visualizations will be helpful in various circumstances?
  • What does the workflow look like for someone using Yellowbrick while iterating on a data science project?
  • What are some of the common points of confusion that your students encounter when learning data science and how has yellowbrick assisted in achieving understanding?
  • How is Yellowbrick iplemented and how has the design changed over the lifetime of the project?
  • What would be required to integrate with other visualization libraries and what benefits (if any) might that provide?
    • What about other ML frameworks?
  • What are some of the most challenging or unexpected aspects of building and maintaining Yellowbrick?
  • What are the limitations or edge cases for yellowbrick?
  • What do you have planned for the future of yellowbrick?
  • Beyond visualization, what are some of the other areas that you would like to see innovation in how data science is taught and/or conducted to make it more accessible?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Destroy All Software With Gary Bernhardt - Episode 159

Summary

Many developers enter the market from backgrounds that don’t involve a computer science degree, which can lead to blind spots of how to approach certain types of problems. Gary Bernhardt produces screen casts and articles that aim to teach these principles with code to make them approachable and easy to understand. In this episode Gary discusses his views on the state of software education, both in academia and bootcamps, the theoretical concepts that he finds most useful in his work, and some thoughts on how to build better software.

Preface

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
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  • Visit the site to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, and read the show notes. And if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions I would love to hear them. You can reach me on Twitter at @Podcast__init__ or email [email protected])
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Gary Bernhardt about teaching and learning Python in the current software landscape

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • As someone who makes a living from teaching aspects of programming what is your view on the state of software education?
    • What are some of the ways that we as an industry can improve the experience of new developers?
    • What are we doing right?
  • You spend a lot of time exploring some of the fundamental aspects of programming and computation. What are some of the lessons that you have learned which transcend software languages?
    • Utility of graphs in understanding software
    • Mechanical sympathy
  • What are the benefits of ‘from scratch’ tutorials that explore the steps involved in building simple versions of complex topics such as compilers or web frameworks?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA