Learning

Software Architecture For Developers with Neal Ford - Episode 149

Summary

Whether it is intentional or accidental, every piece of software has an existing architecture. In this episode Neal Ford discusses the role of a software architect, methods for improving the design of your projects, pitfalls to avoid, and provides some resources for continuing to learn about how to design and build successful systems.

Preface

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • I would like to thank everyone who supports us on Patreon. Your contributions help to make the show sustainable.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next project you’ll need somewhere to deploy it. Check out Linode at podastinit.com/linode and get a $20 credit to try out their fast and reliable Linux virtual servers for running your awesome app. And now you can deliver your work to your users even faster with the newly upgraded 200 GBit network in all of their datacenters.
  • If you’re tired of cobbling together your deployment pipeline then it’s time to try out GoCD, the open source continuous delivery platform built by the people at ThoughtWorks who wrote the book about it. With GoCD you get complete visibility into the life-cycle of your software from one location. To download it now go to podcatinit.com/gocd. Professional support and enterprise plugins are available for added piece of mind.
  • Visit the site to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, and read the show notes. And if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions I would love to hear them. You can reach me on Twitter at @Podcast__init__ or email [email protected])
  • To help other people find the show please leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, tell your friends and co-workers, and share it on social media.
  • A few announcements before we start the show:
    • There is still time to register for the O’Reilly Software Architecture Conference in New York. Use the link podcastinit.com/sacon-new-york to register and save 20%
    • If you work with data or want to learn more about how the projects you have heard about on the show get used in the real world then join me at the Open Data Science Conference in Boston from May 1st through the 4th. It has become one of the largest events for data scientists, data engineers, and data driven businesses to get together and learn how to be more effective. To save 60% off your tickets go to podcastinit.com/odsc-east-2018 and register.
  • With many thanks to O’Reilly Media, I have two items to give away. To sign up you just need to subscribe to the mailing list at podcastinit.com and you will have the chance to win either a copy of Neal’s book, Building Evolutionary Architectures, or a Bronze ticket to the O’Reilly Software Architecture Conference in New York. I will be picking the winners on February 21st.
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Neal Ford about principles of software architecture for developers

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • A majority of your work has been focused on software architectures and how that can be used to facilitate delivery of working systems. Can you start by giving a high level description of what software architecture is and how it fits into the overall development process?
  • One of the difficulties that arise in long-lived projects is that technical debt accrues to the point that forward progress stagnates due to fear that any changes will cause the system to stop functioning. What are some methods that developers can use to either guard against that eventuality, or address it when it happens?
  • What are some of the broad categories of architectural patterns that developers should be aware of?
  • Are there aspects of the language that a system or application is being implemented in which influence the style of architecture that is commonly used?
  • What are some architectural anti-patterns that you have found to be the most commonly occurring?
  • Software is useless if there is no way to deliver it to the end user. What are some of the challenges that are most often overlooked by engineering teams and how do you solve for them?
  • Beyond the purely technological aspects, what other elements of software production and delivery are necessary for a successful architecture?
  • What resources can you recommend for someone who is interested in learning more about software architecture, whether as an individual contributor or in a full time architect role?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

ZimboPy - Episode 148

Summary

Learning to code is one of the most effective ways to be successful in the modern economy. To that end, Marlene Mhangami and Ronald Maravanyika created the ZimboPy organization to teach women and girls in Zimbabwe how to program in Python. In this episode they are joined by Mike Place to discuss how ZimboPy got started, the projects that their students have worked on, and how the community can get involved.

Preface

mu- Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
– I would like to thank everyone who supports us on Patreon. Your contributions help to make the show sustainable.
– When you’re ready to launch your next project you’ll need somewhere to deploy it. Check out Linode at podastinit.com/linode and get a $20 credit to try out their fast and reliable Linux virtual servers for running your awesome app. And now you can deliver your work to your users even faster with the newly upgraded 200 GBit network in all of their datacenters.
– If you’re tired of cobbling together your deployment pipeline then it’s time to try out GoCD, the open source continuous delivery platform built by the people at ThoughtWorks who wrote the book about it. With GoCD you get complete visibility into the life-cycle of your software from one location. To download it now go to podcatinit.com/gocd. Professional support and enterprise plugins are available for added piece of mind.
– Visit the site to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, and read the show notes. And if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions I would love to hear them. You can reach me on Twitter at @Podcast__init__ or email [email protected])
– To help other people find the show please leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, tell your friends and co-workers, and share it on social media.
– Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Marlene Mhangami, Mike Place, and Ronald Maravanyika about ZimboPy, an organization that teaches women and girls in Zimbabwe how to program using Python

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • Can you start by explaining what the mission of ZimboPy is and how it got started?
  • Which languages did you consider using for your lessons and what was your reason for choosing Python?
  • What subject matter do you cover in addition to pure programming concepts?
  • What are some of the types of projects that the students have completed as part of their work with ZimboPy?
  • What have been the most challenging aspects of running ZimboPy?
  • How is ZimboPy supported and what are your plans to ensure future sustainability?
  • Can you share some success stories for the women and girls that you have worked with?
  • For anyone who is interested in replicating your work for other communities what advice do you have?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Learn Leap Fly: Using Python To Promote Global Literacy with Kjell Wooding - Episode 145

Summary

Learning how to read is one of the most important steps in empowering someone to build a successful future. In developing nations, access to teachers and classrooms is not universally available so the Global Learning XPRIZE serves to incentivize the creation of technology that provides children with the tools necessary to teach themselves literacy. Kjell Wooding helped create Learn Leap Fly in order to participate in the competition and used Python and Kivy to build a platform for children to develop their reading skills in a fun and engaging environment. In this episode he discusses his experience participating in the XPRIZE competition, how he and his team built what is now Kasuku Stories, and how Python and its ecosystem helped make it possible.

Preface

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • I would like to thank everyone who supports us on Patreon. Your contributions help to make the show sustainable.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next project you’ll need somewhere to deploy it. Check out Linode at podastinit.com/linode and get a $20 credit to try out their fast and reliable Linux virtual servers for running your awesome app. And now you can deliver your work to your users even faster with the newly upgraded 200 GBit network in all of their datacenters.
  • If you’re tired of cobbling together your deployment pipeline then it’s time to try out GoCD, the open source continuous delivery platform built by the people at ThoughtWorks who wrote the book about it. With GoCD you get complete visibility into the life-cycle of your software from one location. To download it now go to podcatinit.com/gocd. Professional support and enterprise plugins are available for added piece of mind.
  • Visit the site to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, and read the show notes. And if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions I would love to hear them. You can reach me on Twitter at @Podcast__init__ or email [email protected])
  • To help other people find the show please leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, tell your friends and co-workers, and share it on social media.
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Kjell Wooding about Learn Leap Fly, a startup using Python on mobile devices to facilitate global learning

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • Can you start by describing what Learn Leap Fly does and how the company got started?
  • What was your motivation for using Kivy as the primary technology for your mobile applications as opposed to the platform native toolkits or other multi-platform frameworks?
  • What are some of the pedagogical techniques that you have incorporated into the technological aspects of your mobile application and are there any that you were unable to translate to a purely technical implementation.
  • How do you measure the effectiveness of the work that you are doing?
  • How has the framework of the XPRIZE influenced the way in which you have approached the design and development of your work?
  • What have been some of the biggest challenges that you faced in the process of developing and deploying your submission for the XPRIZE?
  • What are some of the features that you have planned for future releases of your platform?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Orange: Visual Data Mining Toolkit with Janez Demšar and Blaž Zupan - Episode 142

Summary

Data mining and visualization are important skills to have in the modern era, regardless of your job responsibilities. In order to make it easier to learn and use these techniques and technologies Blaž Zupan and Janez Demšar, along with many others, have created Orange. In this episode they explain how they built a visual programming interface for creating data analysis and machine learning workflows to simplify the work of gaining insights from the myriad data sources that are available. They discuss the history of the project, how it is built, the challenges that they have faced, and how they plan on growing and improving it in the future.

Preface

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • I would like to thank everyone who supports us on Patreon. Your contributions help to make the show sustainable.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next project you’ll need somewhere to deploy it. Check out Linode at podastinit.com/linode and get a $20 credit to try out their fast and reliable Linux virtual servers for running your awesome app. And now you can deliver your work to your users even faster with the newly upgraded 200 GBit network in all of their datacenters.
  • If you’re tired of cobbling together your deployment pipeline then it’s time to try out GoCD, the open source continuous delivery platform built by the people at ThoughtWorks who wrote the book about it. With GoCD you get complete visibility into the life-cycle of your software from one location. To download it now go to podcatinit.com/gocd. Professional support and enterprise plugins are available for added piece of mind.
  • Visit the site to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, and read the show notes. And if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions I would love to hear them. You can reach me on Twitter at @Podcast__init__ or email [email protected])
  • To help other people find the show please leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, tell your friends and co-workers, and share it on social media.
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Blaž Zupan and Janez Demsar about Orange, a toolbox for interactive machine learning and data visualization in Python

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • What is Orange and what was your motivation for building it?
  • Who is the target audience for this project?
  • How is the graphical interface implemented and what kinds of workflows can be implemented with the visual components?
  • What are some of the most notable or interesting widgets that are available in the catalog?
  • What are the limitations of the graphical interface and what options do user have when they reach those limits?
  • What have been some of the most challenging aspects of building and maintaining Orange?
  • What are some of the most common difficulties that you have seen when users are just getting started with data analysis and machine learning, and how does Orange help overcome those gaps in understanding?
  • What are some of the most interesting or innovative uses of Orange that you are aware of?
  • What are some of the projects or technologies that you consider to be your competition?
  • Under what circumstances would you advise against using Orange?
  • What are some widgets that you would like to see in future versions?
  • What do you have planned for future releases of Orange?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Annapoornima Koppad - Episode 81

Summary

Annapoornima Koppad is a director of the PSF, founder of the Bangalore chapter of PyLadies, and is a Python instructor at the Indian Institute of Science. In this week’s episode she talks about how she got started with Python, her experience running the PyLadies meetup, and working with the PSF.

Brief Introduction

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • I would like to thank everyone who has donated to the show. Your contributions help us make the show sustainable.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next project you’ll need somewhere to deploy it. Check out Linode at linode.com/podcastinit and get a $20 credit to try out their fast and reliable Linux virtual servers for running your awesome app.
  • You’ll want to make sure that your users don’t have to put up with bugs, so you should use Rollbar for tracking and aggregating your application errors to find and fix the bugs in your application before your users notice they exist. Use the link rollbar.com/podcastinit to get 90 days and 300,000 errors for free on their bootstrap plan.
  • Visit our site to subscribe to our show, sign up for our newsletter, read the show notes, and get in touch.
  • To help other people find the show you can leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, and tell your friends and co-workers
  • Join our community! Visit discourse.pythonpodcast.com for your opportunity to find out about upcoming guests, suggest questions, and propose show ideas.
  • Your hosts as usual are Tobias Macey and Chris Patti
  • Today we’re interviewing Annapoornima Koppad about her career with Python and her experiences running the PyLadies chapter in Bangalore, India and being a director for the Python Software Foundation.

Interview with Annapoornima Koppad

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python? – Tobias
  • I noticed that you have been freelancing for several years now. How much of that has been in Python and how has that fed back into your other activities? – Tobias
  • While preparing for this interview I came across the book that you self-published on Amazon. What was your motivation for writing it and who is the target audience? – Tobias
  • Can you tell us about your experience with starting the PyLadies group in Bangalore? What were some of the biggest challenges that you encountered and how have you approached the task of growing awareness and membership of the group? – Tobias
  • You recently started teaching Python at the Indian Institute of Science. What kinds of subject matter do you cover in your lessons? – Tobias
  • What is it about Python and its community that has inspired you to dedicate so much of your time to contributing back to it? – Tobias
  • In what ways would you like to see the Python ecosystem improve? – Tobias
  • You were voted in as a director of the Python Software Foundation in the most recent election. Can you share what responsibilities that entails? – Tobias
  • What would you like to achieve with your time in the PSF? – Tobias

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

K Lars Lohn - Episode 79

Summary

K Lars Lohn has had a long and varied career, spending his most recent years at Mozilla. This week he shares some of his stories about getting involved with Python, his work with Mozilla, and his inspiration for the closing keynote at PyCon US 2016. He also elaborates on the intricate mazes that he draws and his life as an organic farmer in Oregon.

Brief Introduction

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • I would like to thank everyone who has donated to the show. Your contributions help us make the show sustainable. For details on how to support the show you can visit our site at pythonpodcast.com
  • Linode is sponsoring us this week. Check them out at linode.com/podcastinit and get a $20 credit to try out their fast and reliable Linux virtual servers for your next project
  • We also have a new sponsor this week. Rollbar is a service for tracking and aggregating your application errors so that you can find and fix the bugs in your application before your users notice they exist. Use the link rollbar.com/podcastinit to get 90 days and 300,000 errors for free on their bootstrap plan.
  • Visit our site to subscribe to our show, sign up for our newsletter, read the show notes, and get in touch.
  • To help other people find the show you can leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, and tell your friends and co-workers
  • Join our community! Visit discourse.pythonpodcast.com for your opportunity to find out about upcoming guests, suggest questions, and propose show ideas.
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey
  • Today we’re interviewing K Lars Lohn about his career, his art, and his work with Mozilla

Interview with K Lars Lohn

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • You have an interesting pair of articles on your website that attempt to detail how you perceive code and why you think that formatting should be configured in a manner analogous to CSS. Can you explain a bit about how your particular perception affects the way that you program?
  • On your website you have some images of incredibly detailed artwork that are actually mazes. Can you describe some of your creation process for those?
  • What is it about mazes that keeps you interested in them and how did you first start using them as a form of visual art?
  • At Mozilla you have helped to create a project called Socorro which utilizes complexity analysis for correlating stacktraces. How did you conceive of that approach to error monitoring?
  • Can you describe how Socorro is architected and how it works under the covers?
  • At this year’s PyCon US you presented the closing keynote and it was one of the most engaging talks that I’ve seen. Where did you get the inspiration for the content and the mixed media approach?
  • For anyone who hasn’t seen it, you managed to weave together a very personal story with a musical performance, and some applications of complexity analysis into a seamless experience. How much did you have to practice before you felt comfortable delivering that in front of an audience?
  • In addition to your technical career you are also very focused on living in a manner that is sustainable and in tune with your environment. What kinds of synergies and conflicts exist between your professional and personal philosophies?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Lorena Mesa - Episode 78

Summary

One of the great strengths of the Python community is the diversity of backgrounds that our practitioners come from. This week Lorena Mesa talks about how her focus on political science and civic engagement led her to a career in software engineering and data analysis. In addition to her professional career she founded the Chicago chapter of PyLadies, helps teach women and kids how to program, and was voted onto the board of the PSF.

Brief Introduction

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • I would like to thank everyone who has donated to the show. Your contributions help us make the show sustainable.
  • Check out our sponsor Linode for running your awesome new Python apps. Check them out at linode.com/podcastinit and get a $20 credit to try out their fast and reliable Linux virtual servers for your next project
  • You want to make sure your apps are error-free so give our other sponsor, Rollbar, a look. Rollbar is a service for tracking and aggregating your application errors so that you can find and fix the bugs in your application before your users notice they exist. Use the link rollbar.com/podcastinit to get 90 days and 300,000 errors for free on their bootstrap plan.
  • Visit our site to subscribe to our show, sign up for our newsletter, read the show notes, and get in touch.
  • By leaving a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music it becomes easier for other people to find us.
  • Join our community! Visit discourse.pythonpodcast.com to help us grow and connect our wonderful audience.
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey
  • Today we’re interviewing Lorena Mesa about what inspires her in her work as a software engineer and data analyst.

Interview with Lorena Mesa

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • How did your original interests in political science and community outreach lead to your current role as a software engineer?
  • You dedicate a lot of your time to organizations that help teach programming to women and kids. What are some of the most meaningful experiences that you have been able to facilitate?
  • Can you talk a bit about your work getting the PyLadies chapter in Chicago off the ground and what the reaction has been like?
  • Now that you are a member of the board for the PSF, what are your goals in that position?
  • What is it about software development that made you want to change your career path?
  • What are some of the most interesting projects that you have worked on, whether for your employer or for fun?
  • Do you think that the bootcamp you attended did a good job of preparing you for a position in industry?
  • What is your view on the concept that software development is the modern form of literacy? Do you think that everyone should learn how to program?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

PsychoPy with Jonathan Peirce - Episode 76

Summary

We’re delving into the complex workings of your mind this week on Podcast.init with Jonathan Peirce. He tells us about how he started the PsychoPy project and how it has grown in utility and popularity over the years. We discussed the ways that it has been put to use in myriad psychological experiments, the inner workings of how to design and execute those experiments, and what is in store for its future.

Brief Introduction

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • I would like to thank everyone who has donated to the show. Your contributions help us make the show sustainable.
  • Hired is sponsoring us this week. If you’re looking for a job as a developer or designer then Hired will bring the opportunities to you. Sign up at hired.com/podcastinit to double your signing bonus.
  • Once you land a job you can check out our other sponsor Linode for running your awesome new Python apps. Check them out at linode.com/podcastinit and get a $20 credit to try out their fast and reliable Linux virtual servers for your next project
  • You want to make sure your apps are error-free so give our last sponsor, Rollbar, a look. Rollbar is a service for tracking and aggregating your application errors so that you can find and fix the bugs in your application before your users notice they exist. Use the link rollbar.com/podcastinit to get 90 days and 300,000 errors for free on their bootstrap plan.
  • Visit our site to subscribe to our show, sign up for our newsletter, read the show notes, and get in touch.
  • By leaving a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music it becomes easier for other people to find us.
  • Join our community! Visit discourse.pythonpodcast.com to help us grow and connect our wonderful audience.
  • Your hosts as usual are Tobias Macey and Chris Patti
  • Today we’re interviewing Jonathan Peirce about PsychoPy, an open source application for the presentation and collection of stimuli for psychological experimentation

Interview with Jonathan Peirce

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python? – Chris
  • Can you start by telling us what PsychoPy is and how the project got started? – Tobias
  • How does PsychoPy compare feature wise against some of the proprietary alternatives? – Chris
  • In the documentation you mention that this project is useful for the fields of psychophysics, cognitive neuroscience and experimental psychology. Can you provide some insight into how those disciplines differ and what constitutes an experiment? – Tobias
  • Do you find that your users who have no previous formal programming training come up to speed with PsychoPy quickly? What are some of the challenges there? -Chris
  • Can you describe the internal architecture of PsychoPy and how you approached the design? – Tobias
  • How easy is it to extend PsychoPy with new types of stimulus? – Chris
  • What are some interesting challenges you faced when implementing PsychoPy? – Chris
  • I noticed that you support a number of output data formats, including pickle. What are some of the most popular analysis tools for users of PsychoPy? – Tobias
    • Have you investigated the use of the new Feather library? – Tobias
  • How is data input typically managed? Does PsychoPy support automated readings from test equipment or is that the responsibility of those conducting the experiment? – Tobias
  • What are some of the most interesting experiments that you are aware of having been conducted using PsychoPy? – Chris
  • While reading the docs I found the page describing the integration with the OSF (Open Science Framework) for sharing and validating an experiment and the collected data with other members of the field. Can you explain why that is beneficial to the researchers and compare it with other options such as GitHub for use within the sciences? – Tobias
  • Do you have a roadmap of features that you would like to add to PsychoPy or is it largely driven by contributions from practitioners who are extending it to suit their needs? – Tobias

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Alex Martelli - Episode 73

Summary

Alex Martelli has dedicated a large part of his career to teaching others how to work with software. He has the highest number of Python questions answered on Stack Overflow, he has written and co-written a number of books on Python, and presented innumerable times at conferences in multiple countries. We spoke to him about how he got started in software, his work with Google, and the trends in development and design patterns that are shaping modern software engineering.

Brief Introduction

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • I would like to thank everyone who has donated to the show. Your contributions help us make the show sustainable. For details on how to support the show you can visit our site at pythonpodcast.com
  • Linode is sponsoring us this week. Check them out at linode.com/podcastinit and get a $20 credit to try out their fast and reliable Linux virtual servers for your next project
  • We also have a returning sponsor this week. Rollbar is a service for tracking and aggregating your application errors so that you can find and fix the bugs in your application before your users notice they exist. Use the link rollbar.com/podcastinit to get 90 days and 300,000 errors for free on their bootstrap plan.
  • Hired is sponsoring us this week. If you’re looking for a job as a developer or designer then Hired will bring the opportunities to you. Sign up at hired.com/podcastinit to double your signing bonus.
  • Visit our site to subscribe to our show, sign up for our newsletter, read the show notes, and get in touch.
  • To help other people find the show you can leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, and tell your friends and co-workers.
  • Join our community! Visit discourse.pythonpodcast.com for your opportunity to find out about upcoming guests, suggest questions, and propose show ideas.
  • Your hosts as usual are Tobias Macey and Chris Patti
  • Today we’re interviewing Alex Martelli

Interview with Alex Martelli

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python? – Chris
  • You have achieved a number of honors and recognitions throughout your career for significant technical achievements. What kind of learning strategies do you use to enable you to achieve mastery of technical topics? – Tobias
  • How do you keep the Python In A Nutshell book current as aspects of the core language and its libraries change? – Chris
  • You are known for your prolific contributions to Stack Overflow, particularly on topics pertaining to Python. Was that a specific goal that you had set for yourself or did it happen organically? – Tobias
  • When answering Stack Overflow questions, do you usually already know the answers or do you treat it as a learning opportunity? – Tobias
  • What are some of the most difficult Python questions that you have been faced with? – Tobias
  • You have presented quite a number of times at various Python conferences. What are some of your favorite talks? – Tobias
  • Design patterns and idiomatic code are common themes in a number of your presentations. Why is it important for developers to understand these concepts and what are some of your favorite resources on the topic? – Tobias
  • What do you see as the most influential trends in software development and design, both currently and heading into the future? – Tobias
  • As a long-time computer engineer, are there any features or ideas from other languages that you would like to see incorporated into Python?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Dave Beazley - Episode 72

Summary

Dave Beazley has been using and teaching Python since the early days of the language. He has also been instrumental in spreading the gospel of asynchronous programming and the many ways that it can improve the performance of your programs. This week I had the pleasure of speaking with him about his history with the language and some of his favorite presentations and projects.

Brief Introduction

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • I would like to thank everyone who has donated to the show. Your contributions help us make the show sustainable. For details on how to support the show you can visit our site at pythonpodcast.com
  • Linode is sponsoring us this week. Check them out at linode.com/podcastinit and get a $20 credit to try out their fast and reliable Linux virtual servers for your next project
  • We are also sponsored by Sentry this week. Stop hoping your users will report bugs. Sentry’s real-time tracking gives you insight into production deployments and information to reproduce and fix crashes. Check them out at getsentry.com and use the code podcastinit at signup to get a $50 credit!
  • Hired has also returned as a sponsor this week. If you’re looking for a job as a developer or designer then Hired will bring the opportunities to you. Sign up at hired.com/podcastinit to double your signing bonus.
  • Visit our site to subscribe to our show, sign up for our newsletter, read the show notes, and get in touch.
  • To help other people find the show you can leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, and tell your friends and co-workers
  • Join our community! Visit discourse.pythonpodcast.com for your opportunity to find out about upcoming guests, suggest questions, and propose show ideas.
  • Your hosts as usual are Tobias Macey and Chris Patti
  • Today we’re interviewing Dave Beazley about his career with Python

Interview with Dave Beazley

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python? – Tobias
  • How has Python and its community helped to shape your career? – Tobias
  • What are some of the major themes that you have focused on in your work? – Tobias
  • One of the things that you are known for is doing live-coding presentations, many of which are fairly advanced. What is it about that format that appeals to you? – Tobias
    • What are some of your favorite stories about a presentation that didn’t quite go as planned? – Tobias
  • You have given a large number of talks at various conferences. What are some of your favorites? – Tobias
  • What impact do you think that asynchronous programming will have on the future of the Python language and ecosystem? – Tobias
  • Are there any features that you see in other languages that you would like to have incorporated in Python? – Tobias
  • On the about page for your website you talk about some of the low-level code and hardware knowledge that you picked up by working with computers as a kid. Do you think that people who are getting started with programming now are missing out by not getting exposed to the kinds of hardware and software that was present before computing became mainstream?
  • You have had the opportunity to work on a large variety of projects, both on a hobby and professional level. What are some of your favorites? – Tobias
  • What is it about Python that has managed to hold your interest for so many years? – Tobias

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA