Machine Learning

Open Source Automated Machine Learning With MindsDB - Episode 218

Summary

Machine learning is growing in popularity and capability, but for a majority of people it is still a black box that we don’t fully understand. The team at MindsDB is working to change this state of affairs by creating an open source tool that is easy to use without a background in data science. By simplifying the training and use of neural networks, and making their logic explainable, they hope to bring AI capabilities to more people and organizations. In this interview George Hosu and Jorge Torres explain how MindsDB is built, how to use it for your own purposes, and how they view the current landscape of AI technologies. This is a great episode for anyone who is interested in experimenting with machine learning and artificial intelligence. Give it a listen and then try MindsDB for yourself.

Announcements

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next app or want to try a project you hear about on the show, you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so take a look at our friends over at Linode. With 200 Gbit/s private networking, scalable shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40 Gbit/s public network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to scale up. And for your tasks that need fast computation, such as training machine learning models, they just launched dedicated CPU instances. Go to pythonpodcast.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute. And don’t forget to thank them for their continued support of this show!
  • And to keep track of how your team is progressing on building new features and squashing bugs, you need a project management system designed by software engineers, for software engineers. Clubhouse lets you craft a workflow that fits your style, including per-team tasks, cross-project epics, a large suite of pre-built integrations, and a simple API for crafting your own. With such an intuitive tool it’s easy to make sure that everyone in the business is on the same page. Podcast.init listeners get 2 months free on any plan by going to pythonpodcast.com/clubhouse today and signing up for a trial.
  • You listen to this show to learn and stay up to date with the ways that Python is being used, including the latest in machine learning and data analysis. For even more opportunities to meet, listen, and learn from your peers you don’t want to miss out on this year’s conference season. We have partnered with organizations such as O’Reilly Media, Dataversity, and the Open Data Science Conference. Coming up this fall is the combined events of Graphorum and the Data Architecture Summit. The agendas have been announced and super early bird registration for up to $300 off is available until July 26th, with early bird pricing for up to $200 off through August 30th. Use the code BNLLC to get an additional 10% off any pass when you register. Go to pythonpodcast.com/conferences to learn more and take advantage of our partner discounts when you register.
  • Visit the site to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, and read the show notes. And if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions I would love to hear them. You can reach me on Twitter at @Podcast__init__ or email [email protected])
  • To help other people find the show please leave a review on iTunes and tell your friends and co-workers
  • Join the community in the new Zulip chat workspace at pythonpodcast.com/chat
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing George Hosu and Jorge Torres about MindsDB, a framework for streamlining the use of neural networks

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • Can you start by explaining what MindsDB is and the problem that it is trying to solve?
    • What was the motivation for creating the project?
  • Who is the target audience for MindsDB?
  • Before we go deep into MindsDB can you explain what a neural network is for anyone who isn’t familiar with the term?
  • For someone who is using MindsDB can you talk through their workflow?
    • What are the types of data that are supported for building predictions using MindsDB?
    • How much cleaning and preparation of the data is necessary before using it to generate a model?
    • What are the lower and upper bounds for volume and variety of data that can be used to build an effective model in MindsDB?
  • One of the interesting and useful features of MindsDB is the built in support for explaining the decisions reached by a model. How do you approach that challenge and what are the most difficult aspects?
  • Once a model is generated, what is the output format and can it be used separately from MindsDB for embedding the prediction capabilities into other scripts or services?
  • How is MindsDB implemented and how has the design changed since you first began working on it?
    • What are some of the assumptions that you made going into this project which have had to be modified or updated as it gained users and features?
  • What are the limitations of MindsDB and what are the cases where it is necessary to pass a task on to a data scientist?
  • In your experience, what are the common barriers for individuals and organizations adopting machine learning as a tool for addressing their needs?
  • What have been the most challenging, complex, or unexpected aspects of designing and building MindsDB?
  • What do you have planned for the future of MindsDB?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Algorithmic Trading In Python Using Open Tools And Open Data - Episode 216

Summary

Algorithmic trading is a field that has grown in recent years due to the availability of cheap computing and platforms that grant access to historical financial data. QuantConnect is a business that has focused on community engagement and open data access to grant opportunities for learning and growth to their users. In this episode CEO Jared Broad and senior engineer Alex Catarino explain how they have built an open source engine for testing and running algorithmic trading strategies in multiple languages, the challenges of collecting and serving currrent and historical financial data, and how they provide training and opportunity to their community members. If you are curious about the financial industry and want to try it out for yourself then be sure to listen to this episode and experiment with the QuantConnect platform for free.

Announcements

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next app or want to try a project you hear about on the show, you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so take a look at our friends over at Linode. With 200 Gbit/s private networking, scalable shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40 Gbit/s public network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to scale up. And for your tasks that need fast computation, such as training machine learning models, they just launched dedicated CPU instances. Go to pythonpodcast.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute. And don’t forget to thank them for their continued support of this show!
  • And to keep track of how your team is progressing on building new features and squashing bugs, you need a project management system designed by software engineers, for software engineers. Clubhouse lets you craft a workflow that fits your style, including per-team tasks, cross-project epics, a large suite of pre-built integrations, and a simple API for crafting your own. With such an intuitive tool it’s easy to make sure that everyone in the business is on the same page. Podcast.init listeners get 2 months free on any plan by going to pythonpodcast.com/clubhouse today and signing up for a trial.
  • You listen to this show to learn and stay up to date with the ways that Python is being used, including the latest in machine learning and data analysis. For even more opportunities to meet, listen, and learn from your peers you don’t want to miss out on this year’s conference season. We have partnered with organizations such as O’Reilly Media, Dataversity, and the Open Data Science Conference. Coming up this fall is the combined events of Graphorum and the Data Architecture Summit. The agendas have been announced and super early bird registration for up to $300 off is available until July 26th, with early bird pricing for up to $200 off through August 30th. Use the code BNLLC to get an additional 10% off any pass when you register. Go to pythonpodcast.com/conferences to learn more and take advantage of our partner discounts when you register.
  • The Python Software Foundation is the lifeblood of the community, supporting all of us who want to run workshops and conferences, run development sprints or meetups, and ensuring that PyCon is a success every year. They have extended the deadline for their 2019 fundraiser until June 30th and they need help to make sure they reach their goal. Go to pythonpodcast.com/psf today to make a donation. If you’re listening to this after June 30th of 2019 then consider making a donation anyway!
  • Visit the site to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, and read the show notes. And if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions I would love to hear them. You can reach me on Twitter at @Podcast__init__ or email [email protected])
  • To help other people find the show please leave a review on iTunes and tell your friends and co-workers
  • Join the community in the new Zulip chat workspace at pythonpodcast.com/chat
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Jared Broad and Alex Catarino about QuantConnect, a platform for building and testing algorithmic trading strategies on open data and cloud resources

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • Can you start by explaining what QuantConnect is and how the business got started?
  • What is your mission for the company?
  • I know that there are a few other entrants in this market. Can you briefly outline how you compare to the other platforms and maybe characterize the state of the industry?
  • What are the main ways that you and your customers use Python?
  • For someone who is new to the space can you talk through what is involved in writing and testing a trading algorithm?
  • Can you talk through how QuantConnect itself is architected and some of the products and components that comprise your overall platform?
  • I noticed that your trading engine is open source. What was your motivation for making that freely available and how has it influenced your design and development of the project?
  • I know that the core product is built in C# and offers a bridge to Python. Can you talk through how that is implemented?
    • How do you address latency and performance when bridging those two runtimes given the time sensitivity of the problem domain?
  • What are the benefits of using Python for algorithmic trading and what are its shortcomings?
    • How useful and practical are machine learning techniques in this domain?
  • Can you also talk through what Alpha Streams is, including what makes it unique and how it benefits the users of your platform?
  • I appreciate the work that you are doing to foster a community around your platform. What are your strategies for building and supporting that interaction and how does it play into your product design?
  • What are the categories of users who tend to join and engage with your community?
  • What are some of the most interesting, innovative, or unexpected tactics that you have seen your users employ?
  • For someone who is interested in getting started on QuantConnect what is the onboarding process like?
    • What are some resources that you would recommend for someone who is interested in digging deeper into this domain?
  • What are the trends in quantitative finance and algorithmic trading that you find most exciting and most concerning?
  • What do you have planned for the future of QuantConnect?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Building A Privacy Preserving Voice Assistant - Episode 211

Summary

Being able to control a computer with your voice has rapidly moved from science fiction to science fact. Unfortunately, the majority of platforms that have been made available to consumers are controlled by large organizations with little incentive to respect users’ privacy. The team at Snips are building a platform that runs entirely off-line and on-device so that your information is always in your control. In this episode Adrien Ball explains how the Snips architecture works, the challenges of building a speech recognition and natural language understanding toolchain that works on limited resources, and how they are tackling issues around usability for casual consumers. If you have been interested in taking advantage of personal voice assistants, but wary of using commercially available options, this is definitely worth a listen.

Announcements

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next app or want to try a project you hear about on the show, you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so take a look at our friends over at Linode. With 200 Gbit/s private networking, scalable shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40 Gbit/s public network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to scale up. And for your tasks that need fast computation, such as training machine learning models, they just launched dedicated CPU instances. Go to pythonpodcast.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute. And don’t forget to thank them for their continued support of this show!
  • You listen to this show to learn and stay up to date with the ways that Python is being used, including the latest in machine learning and data analysis. For even more opportunities to meet, listen, and learn from your peers you don’t want to miss out on this year’s conference season. We have partnered with organizations such as O’Reilly Media, Dataversity, and the Open Data Science Conference. Go to pythonpodcast.com/conferences to learn more and take advantage of our partner discounts when you register.
  • Visit the site to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, and read the show notes. And if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions I would love to hear them. You can reach me on Twitter at @Podcast__init__ or email [email protected])
  • To help other people find the show please leave a review on iTunes and tell your friends and co-workers
  • Join the community in the new Zulip chat workspace at pythonpodcast.com/chat
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Adrien Ball about SNIPS, a set of technologies to make voice controlled systems that respect user’s privacy

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • Can you start by explaining what the Snips is and how it got started?
  • For someone who wants to use Snips can you talk through the onboarding proces?
    • One of the interesting features of your platform is the option for automated training data generation. Can you explain how that works?
  • Can you describe the overall architecture of the Snips platform and how it has evolved since you first began working on it?
  • Two of the main components that can be used independently are the ASR (Automated Speech Recognition) and NLU (Natural Language Understanding) engines. Each of those have a number of competitors in the market, both open source and commercial. How would you describe your overall position in the market for each of those projects?
  • I know that one of the biggest challenges in conversational interfaces is maintaining context for multi-step interactions. How is that handled in Snips?
  • For the NLU engine, you recently ported it from Python to Rust. What was your motivation for doing so and how would you characterize your experience between the two languages?
    • Are you continuing to maintain both implementations and if so how are you maintaining feature parity?
  • How do you approach the overall usability and user experience, particularly for non-technical end users?
    • How is discoverability handled (e.g. finding out what capabilities/skills are available)
  • One of the compelling aspects of Snips is the ability to deploy to a wide variety of devices, including offline support. Can you talk through that deployment process, both from a user perspective and how it is implemented under the covers?
    • What is involved in updating deployed models and keeping track of which versions are deployed to which devices?
  • What is involved in adding new capabilities or integrations to the Snips platform?
  • What are the limitations of running everything offline and on-device?
    • When is Snips the wrong choice?
  • In the process of building and maintaining the various components of Snips, what have been some of the most useful/interesting/unexpected lessons that you have learned?
    • What have been the most challenging aspects?
  • What are some of the most interesting/innovative/unexpected ways that you have seen the Snips technologies used?
  • What is in store for the future of Snips?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Version Control For Your Machine Learning Projects - Episode 206

Summary

Version control has become table stakes for any software team, but for machine learning projects there has been no good answer for tracking all of the data that goes into building and training models, and the output of the models themselves. To address that need Dmitry Petrov built the Data Version Control project known as DVC. In this episode he explains how it simplifies communication between data scientists, reduces duplicated effort, and simplifies concerns around reproducing and rebuilding models at different stages of the projects lifecycle. If you work as part of a team that is building machine learning models or other data intensive analysis then make sure to give this a listen and then start using DVC today.

Announcements

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next app or want to try a project you hear about on the show, you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so take a look at our friends over at Linode. With 200 Gbit/s private networking, scalable shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40 Gbit/s public network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to scale up. And for your tasks that need fast computation, such as training machine learning models, they just launched dedicated CPU instances. Go to pythonpodcast.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute. And don’t forget to thank them for their continued support of this show!
  • Bots and automation are taking over whole categories of online interaction. Discover.bot is an online community designed to ​serve as a platform-agnostic digital space for bot developers and enthusiasts of all skill levels to learn from one another, share their stories, and move the conversation forward together. They regularly publish guides and resources to help you learn about topics such as bot development, using them for business, and the latest in chatbot news. For newcomers to the space they have the Beginners Guide To Bots that will teach you the basics of how bots work, what they can do, and where they are developed and published. To help you choose the right framework and avoid the confusion about which NLU features and platform APIs you will need they have compiled a list of the major options and how they compare. Go to pythonpodcast.com/discoverbot today to get started and thank them for their support of the show.
  • You listen to this show to learn and stay up to date with what’s happening in databases, streaming platforms, big data, and everything else you need to know about modern data management. For even more opportunities to meet, listen, and learn from your peers you don’t want to miss out on this year’s conference season. We have partnered with organizations such as O’Reilly Media, Dataversity, and the Open Data Science Conference. Go to pythonpodcast.com/conferences to learn more and take advantage of our partner discounts when you register.
  • Visit the site to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, and read the show notes. And if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions I would love to hear them. You can reach me on Twitter at @Podcast__init__ or email [email protected])
  • To help other people find the show please leave a review on iTunes and tell your friends and co-workers
  • Join the community in the new Zulip chat workspace at pythonpodcast.com/chat
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Dmitry Petrov about DVC, an open source version control system for machine learning projects

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • Can you start by explaining what DVC is and how it got started?
  • How do the needs of machine learning projects differ from other software applications in terms of version control?
  • Can you walk through the workflow of a project that uses DVC?
    • What are some of the main ways that it differs from your experience building machine learning projects without DVC?
  • In addition to the data that is used for training, the code that generates the model, and the end result there are other aspects such as the feature definitions and hyperparameters that are used. Can you discuss how those factor into the final model and any facilities in DVC to track the values used?
  • In addition to version control for software applications, there are a number of other pieces of tooling that are useful for building and maintaining healthy projects such as linting and unit tests. What are some of the adjacent concerns that should be considered when building machine learning projects?
  • What types of metrics do you track in DVC and how are they collected?
    • Are there specific problem domains or model types that require tracking different metric formats?
  • In the documentation it mentions that the data files live outside of git and can be managed in external storage systems. I’m wondering if there are any plans to integrate with systems such as Quilt or Pachyderm that provide versioning of data natively and what would be involved in adding that support?
  • What was your motivation for implementing this system in Python?
    • If you were to start over today what would you do differently?
  • Being a venture backed startup that is producing open source products, what is the value equation that makes it worthwile for your investors?
  • What have been some of the most interesting, challenging, or unexpected aspects of building DVC?
  • What do you have planned for the future of DVC?

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  • Tobias
  • Dmitry
    • Go outside and get some fresh air 🙂

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

The Past, Present, and Future of Deep Learning In PyTorch - Episode 202

Summary

The current buzz in data science and big data is around the promise of deep learning, especially when working with unstructured data. One of the most popular frameworks for building deep learning applications is PyTorch, in large part because of their focus on ease of use. In this episode Adam Paszke explains how he started the project, how it compares to other frameworks in the space such as Tensorflow and CNTK, and how it has evolved to support deploying models into production and on mobile devices.

Announcements

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next app or want to try a project you hear about on the show, you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so take a look at our friends over at Linode. With 200 Gbit/s private networking, scalable shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40 Gbit/s public network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to scale up. And for your tasks that need fast computation, such as training machine learning models, they just launched dedicated CPU instances. Go to pythonpodcast.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute. And don’t forget to thank them for their continued support of this show!
  • Visit the site to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, and read the show notes. And if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions I would love to hear them. You can reach me on Twitter at @Podcast__init__ or email [email protected])
  • To help other people find the show please leave a review on iTunes and tell your friends and co-workers
  • Join the community in the new Zulip chat workspace at pythonpodcast.com/chat
  • Check out the Practical AI podcast from our friends at Changelog Media to learn and stay up to date with what’s happening in AI
  • You listen to this show to learn and stay up to date with the ways that Python is being used, including the latest in machine learning and data analysis. For even more opportunities to meet, listen, and learn from your peers you don’t want to miss out on this year’s conference season. We have partnered with O’Reilly Media for the Strata conference in San Francisco on March 25th and the Artificial Intelligence conference in NYC on April 15th. Here in Boston, starting on May 17th, you still have time to grab a ticket to the Enterprise Data World, and from April 30th to May 3rd is the Open Data Science Conference. Go to pythonpodcast.com/conferences to learn more and take advantage of our partner discounts when you register.
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Adam Paszke about PyTorch, an open source deep learning platform that provides a seamless path from research prototyping to production deployment

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • Can you start by explaining what deep learning is and how it relates to machine learning and artificial intelligence?
  • Can you explain what PyTorch is and your motivation for creating it?
    • Why was it important for PyTorch to be open source?
  • There is currently a large and growing ecosystem of deep learning tools built for Python. Can you describe the current landscape and how PyTorch fits in relation to projects such as Tensorflow and CNTK?
    • What are some of the ways that PyTorch is different from Tensorflow and CNTK, and what are the areas where these frameworks are converging?
  • How much knowledge of machine learning, artificial intelligence, or neural network topologies are necessary to make use of PyTorch?
    • What are some of the foundational topics that are most useful to know when getting started with PyTorch?
  • Can you describe how PyTorch is architected/implemented and how it has evolved since you first began working on it?
    • You recently reached the 1.0 milestone. Can you talk about the journey to that point and the goals that you set for the release?
  • What are some of the other components of the Python ecosystem that are most commonly incorporated into projects based on PyTorch?
  • What are some of the most novel, interesting, or unexpected uses of PyTorch that you have seen?
  • What are some cases where PyTorch is the wrong choice for a problem?
  • What is the process for incorporating these new techniques and discoveries into the PyTorch framework?
    • What are the areas of active research that you are most excited about?
  • What are some of the most interesting/useful/unexpected/challenging lessons that you have learned in the process of building and maintaining PyTorch?
  • What do you have planned for the future of PyTorch?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Polyglot: Multi-Lingual Natural Language Processing with Rami Al-Rfou - Episode 190

Summary

Using computers to analyze text can produce useful and inspirational insights. However, when working with multiple languages the capabilities of existing models are severely limited. In order to help overcome this limitation Rami Al-Rfou built Polyglot. In this episode he explains his motivation for creating a natural language processing library with support for a vast array of languages, how it works, and how you can start using it for your own projects. He also discusses current research on multi-lingual text analytics, how he plans to improve Polyglot in the future, and how it fits in the Python ecosystem.

Preface

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next app or want to try a project you hear about on the show, you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so check out Linode. With 200 Gbit/s private networking, scalable shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40 Gbit/s public network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to scale up. Go to pythonpodcast.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute.
  • And to keep track of how your team is progressing on building new features and squashing bugs, you need a project management system designed by software engineers, for software engineers. Clubhouse lets you craft a workflow that fits your style, including per-team tasks, cross-project epics, a large suite of pre-built integrations, and a simple API for crafting your own. Podcast.__init__ listeners get 2 months free on any plan by going to pythonpodcast.com/clubhouse today and signing up for a trial.
  • Visit the site to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, and read the show notes. And if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions I would love to hear them. You can reach me on Twitter at @Podcast__init__ or email [email protected])
  • To help other people find the show please leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, tell your friends and co-workers, and share it on social media.
  • Join the community in the new Zulip chat workspace at pythonpodcast.com/chat
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Rami Al-Rfou about Polyglot, a natural language pipeline with support for an impressive amount of languages

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • Can you start by describing what Polyglot is and your reasons for starting the project?
  • What are the types of use cases that Polyglot enables which would be impractical with something such as NLTK or SpaCy?
  • A majority of NLP libraries have a limited set of languages that they support. What is involved in adding support for a given language to a natural language tool?
    • What is involved in adding a new language to Polyglot?
    • Which families of languages are the most challenging to support?
  • What types of operations are supported and how consistently are they supported across languages?
  • How is Polyglot implemented?
  • Is there any capacity for integrating Polyglot with other tools such as SpaCy or Gensim?
  • How much domain knowledge is required to be able to effectively use Polyglot within an application?
  • What are some of the most interesting or unique uses of Polyglot that you have seen?
  • What have been some of the most complex or challenging aspects of building Polyglot?
  • What do you have planned for the future of Polyglot?
  • What are some areas of NLP research that you are excited for?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Of Checklists, Ethics, and Data with Emily Miller and Peter Bull - Episode 184

Summary

As data science becomes more widespread and has a bigger impact on the lives of people, it is important that those projects and products are built with a conscious consideration of ethics. Keeping ethical principles in mind throughout the lifecycle of a data project helps to reduce the overall effort of preventing negative outcomes from the use of the final product. Emily Miller and Peter Bull of Driven Data have created Deon to improve the communication and conversation around ethics among and between data teams. It is a Python project that generates a checklist of common concerns for data oriented projects at the various stages of the lifecycle where they should be considered. In this episode they discuss their motivation for creating the project, the challenges and benefits of maintaining such a checklist, and how you can start using it today.

Preface

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next app you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so check out Linode. With private networking, shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40Gbit network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to scale up. Go to podcastinit.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute.
  • Visit the site to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, and read the show notes. And if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions I would love to hear them. You can reach me on Twitter at @Podcast__init__ or email [email protected])
  • To help other people find the show please leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, tell your friends and co-workers, and share it on social media.
  • Join the community in the new Zulip chat workspace at podcastinit.com/chat
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Emily Miller and Peter Bull about Deon, an ethics checklist for data projects

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • Can you start by describing what Deon is and your motivation for creating it?
  • Why a checklist, specifically? What’s the advantage of this over an oath, for example?
  • What is unique to data science in terms of the ethical concerns, as compared to traditional software engineering?
  • What is the typical workflow for a team that is using Deon in their projects?
  • Deon ships with a default checklist but allows for customization. What are some common addendums that you have seen?
    • Have you received pushback on any of the default items?
  • How does Deon simplify communication around ethics across team boundaries?
  • What are some of the most often overlooked items?
  • What are some of the most difficult ethical concerns to comply with for a typical data science project?
  • How has Deon helped you at Driven Data?
  • What are the customer facing impacts of embedding a discussion of ethics in the product development process?
  • Some of the items on the default checklist coincide with regulatory requirements. Are there any cases where regulation is in conflict with an ethical concern that you would like to see practiced?
  • What are your hopes for the future of the Deon project?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Understanding Machine Learning Through Visualizations with Benjamin Bengfort and Rebecca Bilbro - Episode 166

Summary

Machine learning models are often inscrutable and it can be difficult to know whether you are making progress. To improve feedback and speed up iteration cycles Benjamin Bengfort and Rebecca Bilbro built Yellowbrick to easily generate visualizations of model performance. In this episode they explain how to use Yellowbrick in the process of building a machine learning project, how it aids in understanding how different parameters impact the outcome, and the improved understanding among teammates that it creates. They also explain how it integrates with the scikit-learn API, the difficulty of producing effective visualizations, and future plans for improvement and new features.

Preface

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next app you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so check out Linode. With private networking, shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40Gbit network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to scale up. Go to podcastinit.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute.
  • To get worry-free releases download GoCD, the open source continous delivery server built by Thoughworks. You can use their pipeline modeling and value stream map to build, control and monitor every step from commit to deployment in one place. And with their new Kubernetes integration it’s even easier to deploy and scale your build agents. Go to podcastinit.com/gocd to learn more about their professional support services and enterprise add-ons.
  • Visit the site to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, and read the show notes. And if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions I would love to hear them. You can reach me on Twitter at @Podcast__init__ or email [email protected])
  • To help other people find the show please leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, tell your friends and co-workers, and share it on social media.
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Rebecca Bilbro and Benjamin Bengfort about Yellowbrick, a scikit extension to use visualizations for assisting with model selection in your data science projects.

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • Can you describe the use case for Yellowbrick and how the project got started?
  • What is involved in visualizing scikit-learn models?
    • What kinds of information do the visualizations convey?
    • How do they aid in understanding what is happening in the models?
  • How much direction does yellowbrick provide in terms of knowing which visualizations will be helpful in various circumstances?
  • What does the workflow look like for someone using Yellowbrick while iterating on a data science project?
  • What are some of the common points of confusion that your students encounter when learning data science and how has yellowbrick assisted in achieving understanding?
  • How is Yellowbrick iplemented and how has the design changed over the lifetime of the project?
  • What would be required to integrate with other visualization libraries and what benefits (if any) might that provide?
    • What about other ML frameworks?
  • What are some of the most challenging or unexpected aspects of building and maintaining Yellowbrick?
  • What are the limitations or edge cases for yellowbrick?
  • What do you have planned for the future of yellowbrick?
  • Beyond visualization, what are some of the other areas that you would like to see innovation in how data science is taught and/or conducted to make it more accessible?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Asking Questions From Data Using Active Learning with Tivadar Danka - Episode 162

Summary

One of the challenges of machine learning is obtaining large enough volumes of well labelled data. An approach to mitigate the effort required for labelling data sets is active learning, in which outliers are identified and labelled by domain experts. In this episode Tivadar Danka describes how he built modAL to bring active learning to bioinformatics. He is using it for doing human in the loop training of models to detect cell phenotypes with massive unlabelled datasets. He explains how the library works, how he designed it to be modular for a broad set of use cases, and how you can use it for training models of your own.

Preface

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next app you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so check out Linode. With private networking, shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40Gbit network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to scale up. Go to podcastinit.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute.
  • To get worry-free releases download GoCD, the open source continous delivery server built by Thoughworks. You can use their pipeline modeling and value stream map to build, control and monitor every step from commit to deployment in one place. And with their new Kubernetes integration it’s even easier to deploy and scale your build agents. Go to podcastinit.com/gocd to learn more about their professional support services and enterprise add-ons.
  • Visit the site to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, and read the show notes. And if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions I would love to hear them. You can reach me on Twitter at @Podcast__init__ or email [email protected])
  • To help other people find the show please leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, tell your friends and co-workers, and share it on social media.
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Tivadar Danka about modAL, a modular active learning framework for Python3

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • What is active learning?
    • How does it differ from other approaches to machine learning?
  • What is modAL and what was your motivation for starting the project?
  • For someone who is using modAL, what does a typical workflow look like to train their models?
  • How do you avoid oversampling and causing the human in the loop to become overwhelmed with labeling requirements?
  • What are the most challenging aspects of building and using modAL?
  • What do you have planned for the future of modAL?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Scaling Deep Learning Using Polyaxon with Mourad Mourafiq - Episode 158

Summary

With libraries such as Tensorflow, PyTorch, scikit-learn, and MXNet being released it is easier than ever to start a deep learning project. Unfortunately, it is still difficult to manage scaling and reproduction of training for these projects. Mourad Mourafiq built Polyaxon on top of Kubernetes to address this shortcoming. In this episode he shares his reasons for starting the project, how it works, and how you can start using it today.

Preface

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next app you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so check out Linode. With private networking, shared block storage, node balancers, and a 200Gbit network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to scale up. Go to podcastinit.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute.
  • Finding a bug in production is never a fun experience, especially when your users find it first. Airbrake error monitoring ensures that you will always be the first to know so you can deploy a fix before anyone is impacted. With open source agents for Python 2 and 3 it’s easy to get started, and the automatic aggregations, contextual information, and deployment tracking ensure that you don’t waste time pinpointing what went wrong. Go to podcastinit.com/airbrake today to sign up and get your first 30 days free, and 50% off 3 months of the Startup plan.
  • To get worry-free releases download GoCD, the open source continous delivery server built by Thoughworks. You can use their pipeline modeling and value stream map to build, control and monitor every step from commit to deployment in one place. And with their new Kubernetes integration it’s even easier to deploy and scale your build agents. Go to podcastinit.com/gocd to learn more about their professional support services and enterprise add-ons.
  • Visit the site to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, and read the show notes. And if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions I would love to hear them. You can reach me on Twitter at @Podcast__init__ or email [email protected])
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Mourad Mourafiq about Polyaxon, a platform for building, training and monitoring large scale deep learning applications.

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • Can you give a quick overview of what Polyaxon is and your motivation for creating it?
  • What is a typical workflow for building and testing a deep learning application?
  • How is Polyaxon implemented?
    • How has the internal architecture evolved since you first started working on it?
    • What is unique to deep learning workloads that makes it necessary to have a dedicated tool for deploying them?
    • What does Polyaxon add on top of the existing functionality in Kubernetes?
  • It can be difficult to build a docker container that holds all of the necessary components for a complex application. What are some tips or best practices for creating containers to be used with Polyaxon?
  • What are the relative tradeoffs of the various deep learning frameworks that you support?
  • For someone who is getting started with Polyaxon what does the workflow look like?
    • What is involved in migrating existing projects to run on Polyaxon?
  • What have been the most challenging aspects of building Polyaxon?
  • What are your plans for the future of Polyaxon?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA