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ERPNext with Rushabh Mehta - Episode 90

Summary

If you need to track all of the pieces of a business and don’t want to use 15 different tools then you should probably be looking at an ERP (Enterprise Resource Planning) system. Unfortunately, a lot of them are big, clunky, and difficult to manage, so Rushabh Mehta decided to build one that isn’t. ERPNext is an open-source, web-based, easy to use ERP platform built with Python.

Brief Introduction

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • I would like to thank everyone who has donated to the show. Your contributions help us make the show sustainable.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next project you’ll need somewhere to deploy it. Check out Linode at linode.com/podcastinit and get a $20 credit to try out their fast and reliable Linux virtual servers for running your awesome app.
  • You’ll want to make sure that your users don’t have to put up with bugs, so you should use Rollbar for tracking and aggregating your application errors to find and fix the bugs in your application before your users notice they exist. Use the link rollbar.com/podcastinit to get 90 days and 300,000 errors for free on their bootstrap plan.
  • Visit our site to subscribe to our show, sign up for our newsletter, read the show notes, and get in touch.
  • To help other people find the show you can leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, and tell your friends and co-workers
  • Join our community! Visit discourse.pythonpodcast.com for your opportunity to find out about upcoming guests, suggest questions, and propose show ideas.
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Rushabh Mehta about ERPNext

Interview with Rushabh Mehta

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • What does ERP stand for and what kinds of busineesses require that kind of software?
  • What problem were you trying to solve when you created ERPNext and what factors led to the decision to write it in Python?
  • How is ERPNext architected and what are some of the biggest challenges that were faced during its creation?
  • While researching the project I noticed that you created your own framework which is used for building ERPNext. What was lacking in the existing options that made building a new framework appealing?
  • What are some of the projects that you consider to be your competitors and what are the features that would convince a user to choose ERPNext?
  • For someone who wants to self-host ERPNext what are the system requirements and what does the scaling strategy look like?
  • On the marketing site for ERPNext it is advertised as being for small and medium businesses. What are the characteristics of larger businesses that might not make them a good fit for the features or structure of ERPNext?
  • What are some of the most interesting or unexpected ways that you have seen ERPNext put to use?
  • Are there any interesting projects of features that you are working on for release in the near future?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Jackie Kazil - Episode 89

Summary

Jackie Kazil has led a distinguished and varied career with a strong focus on providing information and tools that empower others. This includes her work in data journalism, as a presidential innovation fellow, co-founding 18F, co-authoring a book, and being elected to the board of the Python Software Foundation. In this episode she shares these stories and more with us and how Python has helped her along the way.

Brief Introduction

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • I would like to thank everyone who has donated to the show. Your contributions help us make the show sustainable.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next project you’ll need somewhere to deploy it. Check out Linode at linode.com/podcastinit and get a $20 credit to try out their fast and reliable Linux virtual servers for running your application.
  • You’ll want to make sure that your users don’t have to put up with bugs, so you should use Rollbar for tracking and aggregating your application errors to find and fix the bugs before your users notice they exist. Use the link rollbar.com/podcastinit to get 90 days and 300,000 errors for free on their bootstrap plan.
  • Visit our site to subscribe to our show, sign up for our newsletter, read the show notes, and get in touch.
  • To help other people find the show you can leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, and tell your friends and co-workers
  • Join our community! Visit discourse.pythonpodcast.com to join other listeners of the show and share ideas for how to make it better.
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Jackie Kazil about her work with 18F, writing Data Wrangling with Python, and her career with Python.

Interview with Jackie Kazil

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • Looking at your background it shows that you got your start in Journalism and that you are now working on an additional degree in Computational Social Science. Can you share a bit about that journey and what set you on that path?
  • What is computational social science and what has your particular focus been within that field?
  • How has your work in news media prepared you for your current role?
  • One of your many notable achievements is co-founding 18F. Can you start by explaining what that organization is and how you got involved in the efforts to build it?
  • What are some of the notable uses of Python at 18F?
  • In what ways did your experience working with 18F differ from the work you have done at companies outside of government?
  • You recently co-wrote and published Data Wrangling with Python through O’Reilly Media. What kind of subject matter do you cover in the book and who is the target audience?
  • There are a number of resources available to learn the various tools for working with data in Python. What is the gap that this book is aiming to fill and how did you get started with it?
  • What are some of the most interesting things that you learned while working on the book?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Weblate with Michal Čihař - Episode 88

Summary

Adding translations to our projects makes them usable in more places by more people which, ultimately, makes them more valuable. Managing the localization process can be difficult if you don’t have the right tools, so this week Michal čihař tells us about the Weblate project and how it simplifies the process of integrating your translations with your source code.

Brief Introduction

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • I would like to thank everyone who has donated to the show. Your contributions help us make the show sustainable.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next project you’ll need somewhere to deploy it. Check out Linode at linode.com/podcastinit and get a $20 credit to try out their fast and reliable Linux virtual servers for running your awesome app.
  • You’ll want to make sure that your users don’t have to put up with bugs, so you should use Rollbar for tracking and aggregating your application errors to find and fix the bugs in your application before your users notice they exist. Use the link rollbar.com/podcastinit to get 90 days and 300,000 errors for free on their bootstrap plan.
  • Visit our site to subscribe to our show, sign up for our newsletter, read the show notes, and get in touch.
  • To help other people find the show you can leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, and tell your friends and co-workers
  • Join our community! Visit discourse.pythonpodcast.com for your opportunity to find out about upcoming guests, suggest questions, and propose show ideas.
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Michal Čihař about Weblate

Interview with Michal Čihař

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • Can you explain what Weblate is and the problem that you were trying to solve by creating it?
  • What are the benefits of using Weblate over other tools for localization and internationalization?
  • One of the advertised features of Weblate is integration with git and mercurial. Can you explain how that works and what a typical translation workflow looks like both for a developer and a translator?
  • Given that part of the focus for the tool is to allow for community translation, how do you simplify the experience for first time contributors?
  • I understand that Weblate is written as a django application. Is it possible to use Weblate with other Web frameworks or non-web projects?
    • Can this be used with projects implemented in other programming laguages? Are there any capabilities that are lot in this scenario?
  • Why should developers and product managers be concerned with localizing an application? How does Weblate help to reduce the level of investment necessary for such an undertaking?
  • What are some of the biggest difficulties that you have encountered while building and maintaining Weblate?
  • What are the most common problems that you see people encounter on both the translator and developer side when dealing with internationalization and localization?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

SpaCy with Matthew Honnibal - Episode 87

Summary

As the amount of text available on the internet and in businesses continues to increase, the need for fast and accurate language analysis becomes more prominent. This week Matthew Honnibal, the creator of SpaCy, talks about his experiences researching natural language processing and creating a library to make his findings accessible to industry.

Brief Introduction

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • I would like to thank everyone who has donated to the show. Your contributions help us make the show sustainable.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next project you’ll need somewhere to deploy it. Check out Linode at linode.com/podcastinit and get a $20 credit to try out their fast and reliable Linux virtual servers for running your awesome app.
  • You’ll want to make sure that your users don’t have to put up with bugs, so you should use Rollbar for tracking and aggregating your application errors to find and fix the bugs in your application before your users notice they exist. Use the link rollbar.com/podcastinit to get 90 days and 300,000 errors for free on their bootstrap plan.
  • Visit our site to subscribe to our show, sign up for our newsletter, read the show notes, and get in touch.
  • To help other people find the show you can leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, and tell your friends and co-workers
  • Join our community! Visit discourse.pythonpodcast.com for your opportunity to find out about upcoming guests, suggest questions, and propose show ideas.
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Matthew Honnibal about SpaCy and Explosion.AI

Interview with Matthew Honnibal

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • Can you start by sharing what SpaCy is and what problem you were trying to solve when you created it?
  • Another project for natural language processing that has been part of the Python ecosystem for a number of years is the Natural Language Tool Kit (NLTK). How does SpaCy differ from the NLTK and are there any cases where that would be the better choice?
  • How much knowledge of NLP and computational linguistics is necessary to be able to use SpaCy?
  • What does the internal design and architecture of SpaCy look like and what are the biggest challenges associated with its development to date and into the future?
  • One of the projects that you have built around SpaCy which I think is really cool and caught my attention when I first found your project is the displaCy visualization tool. Can you explain what that is and why you think it is important?
  • What are some kinds of applications where SpaCy would be useful which might not be obvious candidates for it?
  • Why is speed such an important focus for an NLP library?
  • One of the ways that you have been able to gain a speed boost is through releasing the GIL and allowing for true parallelism via Cython. How have you managed to ensure that this doesn’t lead to data races and program failures?
  • Building on the success of SpaCy you founded a company called Explosion AI. Can you explain what your goals are for this endeavor and the kinds of services that you are offering?
  • What are some of the most interesting uses of SpaCy that you have seen?
  • What do you have planned for the future of SpaCy?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Kinto with Alexis Metaireau and Mathieu Leplatre - Episode 86

Summary

Are you looking for a backend as a service offering where you have full control of your data? Look no further than Kinto! This week Alexis Metaireau and Mathieu Leplatre share the story of how Kinto was created, how it works under the covers, and some of the ways that it is being used at Mozilla and around the web.

Brief Introduction

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • I would like to thank everyone who has donated to the show. Your contributions help us make the show sustainable.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next project you’ll need somewhere to deploy it. Check out Linode at linode.com/podcastinit and get a $20 credit to try out their fast and reliable Linux virtual servers for running your awesome app.
  • You’ll want to make sure that your users don’t have to put up with bugs, so you should use Rollbar for tracking and aggregating your application errors to find and fix the bugs in your application before your users notice they exist. Use the link rollbar.com/podcastinit to get 90 days and 300,000 errors for free on their bootstrap plan.
  • Visit our site to subscribe to our show, sign up for our newsletter, read the show notes, and get in touch.
  • To help other people find the show you can leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, and tell your friends and co-workers
  • Join our community! Visit discourse.pythonpodcast.com for your opportunity to find out about upcoming guests, suggest questions, and propose show ideas.
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Alexis Metaireau and Mathieu Leplatre about Kinto

Interview with Alexis and Mathieu

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • What is Kinto and how did it get started?
  • What does the internal architecture of Kinto look like?
  • Given that the primary data format being stored is JSON, why did you choose PostGreSQL as your storage backend instead of a NoSQL document database such as CouchDB?
  • Synchronization of transactions from multiple users, including offline first support, is a difficult problem. How have you approached that in Kinto and what are some of the alternate solutions that were considered?
  • Designing usable APIs is a complicated subject. What features did you prioritize while creating the interfaces to Kinto?
  • What are some of the most innovative uses of Kinto that you have seen?
  • What are some of the biggest challenges that you have faced while building Kinto?
  • What do you have planned for the future of Kinto?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Python for GIS with Sean Gillies - Episode 80

Summary

Location is an increasingly relevant aspect of software systems as we have more internet connected devices with GPS capabilities. GIS (Geographic Information Systems) are used for processing and analyzing this data, and fortunately Python has a suite of libraries to facilitate these endeavors. This week Sean Gillies, an author and contributor of many of these tools, shares the story of his career and contributions, and the work that he is doing at MapBox.

Brief Introduction

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • I would like to thank everyone who has donated to the show. Your contributions help us make the show sustainable.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next project you’ll need somewhere to deploy it. Check out Linode at linode.com/podcastinit and get a $20 credit to try out their fast and reliable Linux virtual servers for running your awesome app.
  • You’ll want to make sure that your users don’t have to put up with bugs, so you should use Rollbar for tracking and aggregating your application errors to find and fix the bugs in your application before your users notice they exist. Use the link rollbar.com/podcastinit to get 90 days and 300,000 errors for free on their bootstrap plan.
  • Visit our site to subscribe to our show, sign up for our newsletter, read the show notes, and get in touch.
  • To help other people find the show you can leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, and tell your friends and co-workers
  • Join our community! Visit discourse.pythonpodcast.com for your opportunity to find out about upcoming guests, suggest questions, and propose show ideas.
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey
  • Today I’m interviewing Sean Gillies about writing Geographic Information Systems in Python.

Interview with Sean Gillies

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • Can you start by describing what Geographic Information Systems are and what kinds of projects might take advantage of them?
  • How did you first get involved in the area of GIS and location-based computation?
  • What was the state of the Python ecosystem like for writing these kinds of applications?
  • You have created and contributed to a number of the canonical tools for building GIS systems in Python. Can you list at least some of them and describe how they fit together for different applications?
  • What are some of the unique challenges associated with trying to model geographical features in a manner that allows for effective computation?
    • How does the complexity of modeling and computation scale with increasing land area?
  • Mapping and cartography have an incredibly long history with an ever-evolving set of tools. What does our digital age bring to this time-honored discipline that was previously impossible or impractical?
  • To build accurate and effective representations of our physical world there are a number of domains involved, such as geometry and geography. What advice do you have for someone who is interested in getting started in this particular niche?
  • What level of expertise would you advise for someone who simply wants to add some location-aware features to their application?
  • I know that you joined Mapbox a little while ago. Which parts of their stack are written in Python?
  • What are the areas where Python still falls short and which languages or tools do you turn to in those cases?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

K Lars Lohn - Episode 79

Summary

K Lars Lohn has had a long and varied career, spending his most recent years at Mozilla. This week he shares some of his stories about getting involved with Python, his work with Mozilla, and his inspiration for the closing keynote at PyCon US 2016. He also elaborates on the intricate mazes that he draws and his life as an organic farmer in Oregon.

Brief Introduction

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • I would like to thank everyone who has donated to the show. Your contributions help us make the show sustainable. For details on how to support the show you can visit our site at pythonpodcast.com
  • Linode is sponsoring us this week. Check them out at linode.com/podcastinit and get a $20 credit to try out their fast and reliable Linux virtual servers for your next project
  • We also have a new sponsor this week. Rollbar is a service for tracking and aggregating your application errors so that you can find and fix the bugs in your application before your users notice they exist. Use the link rollbar.com/podcastinit to get 90 days and 300,000 errors for free on their bootstrap plan.
  • Visit our site to subscribe to our show, sign up for our newsletter, read the show notes, and get in touch.
  • To help other people find the show you can leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, and tell your friends and co-workers
  • Join our community! Visit discourse.pythonpodcast.com for your opportunity to find out about upcoming guests, suggest questions, and propose show ideas.
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey
  • Today we’re interviewing K Lars Lohn about his career, his art, and his work with Mozilla

Interview with K Lars Lohn

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • You have an interesting pair of articles on your website that attempt to detail how you perceive code and why you think that formatting should be configured in a manner analogous to CSS. Can you explain a bit about how your particular perception affects the way that you program?
  • On your website you have some images of incredibly detailed artwork that are actually mazes. Can you describe some of your creation process for those?
  • What is it about mazes that keeps you interested in them and how did you first start using them as a form of visual art?
  • At Mozilla you have helped to create a project called Socorro which utilizes complexity analysis for correlating stacktraces. How did you conceive of that approach to error monitoring?
  • Can you describe how Socorro is architected and how it works under the covers?
  • At this year’s PyCon US you presented the closing keynote and it was one of the most engaging talks that I’ve seen. Where did you get the inspiration for the content and the mixed media approach?
  • For anyone who hasn’t seen it, you managed to weave together a very personal story with a musical performance, and some applications of complexity analysis into a seamless experience. How much did you have to practice before you felt comfortable delivering that in front of an audience?
  • In addition to your technical career you are also very focused on living in a manner that is sustainable and in tune with your environment. What kinds of synergies and conflicts exist between your professional and personal philosophies?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Lorena Mesa - Episode 78

Summary

One of the great strengths of the Python community is the diversity of backgrounds that our practitioners come from. This week Lorena Mesa talks about how her focus on political science and civic engagement led her to a career in software engineering and data analysis. In addition to her professional career she founded the Chicago chapter of PyLadies, helps teach women and kids how to program, and was voted onto the board of the PSF.

Brief Introduction

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • I would like to thank everyone who has donated to the show. Your contributions help us make the show sustainable.
  • Check out our sponsor Linode for running your awesome new Python apps. Check them out at linode.com/podcastinit and get a $20 credit to try out their fast and reliable Linux virtual servers for your next project
  • You want to make sure your apps are error-free so give our other sponsor, Rollbar, a look. Rollbar is a service for tracking and aggregating your application errors so that you can find and fix the bugs in your application before your users notice they exist. Use the link rollbar.com/podcastinit to get 90 days and 300,000 errors for free on their bootstrap plan.
  • Visit our site to subscribe to our show, sign up for our newsletter, read the show notes, and get in touch.
  • By leaving a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music it becomes easier for other people to find us.
  • Join our community! Visit discourse.pythonpodcast.com to help us grow and connect our wonderful audience.
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey
  • Today we’re interviewing Lorena Mesa about what inspires her in her work as a software engineer and data analyst.

Interview with Lorena Mesa

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • How did your original interests in political science and community outreach lead to your current role as a software engineer?
  • You dedicate a lot of your time to organizations that help teach programming to women and kids. What are some of the most meaningful experiences that you have been able to facilitate?
  • Can you talk a bit about your work getting the PyLadies chapter in Chicago off the ground and what the reaction has been like?
  • Now that you are a member of the board for the PSF, what are your goals in that position?
  • What is it about software development that made you want to change your career path?
  • What are some of the most interesting projects that you have worked on, whether for your employer or for fun?
  • Do you think that the bootcamp you attended did a good job of preparing you for a position in industry?
  • What is your view on the concept that software development is the modern form of literacy? Do you think that everyone should learn how to program?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Podbuzzz with Kyle Martin - Episode 77

Summary

Podcasts are becoming more popular now than they ever have been. Podbuzzz is a service for helping podcasters to track their reviews and imporove SEO to reach a wider audience. In this episode we spoke with Kyle Martin about his experience using Python to build Podbuzzz and manage it in production.

Brief Introduction

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • I would like to thank everyone who has donated to the show. Your contributions help us make the show sustainable.
  • You need a place to run your awesome new Python apps, so check out our sponsor Linode at linode.com/podcastinit and get a $20 credit to try out their fast and reliable Linux virtual servers for your next project.
  • You want to make sure your apps are error-free so give our next sponsor, Rollbar, a look. Rollbar is a service for tracking and aggregating your application errors so that you can find and fix the bugs in your application before your users notice they exist. Use the link rollbar.com/podcastinit to get 90 days and 300,000 errors for free on their bootstrap plan.
  • Visit our site to subscribe to our show, sign up for our newsletter, read the show notes, and get in touch.
  • By leaving a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music it becomes easier for other people to find us.
  • Join our community! Visit discourse.pythonpodcast.com to help us grow and connect our wonderful audience.
  • Your hosts as usual are Tobias Macey and Chris Patti
  • Today we’re interviewing Kyle Martin about Podbuzzz

Interview with Kyle Martin

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python? – Chris
  • Can you start by explaining what Podbuzz is? – Tobias
  • Why did you end up choosing Python as the language for building thx#is service? – Tobias
  • What have been the biggest engineering challenges in building Podbuzzz? – Tobias
  • How did you conceive of the idea to build Podbuzzz and what inspired you to provide it as a service? – Tobias
  • Part of the service that you are building is a widget that encourages listeners to rate a podcast on iTunes. Why is that important and what are some of the techniques that you have leveraged to determine the most effective messaging? – Tobias
  • What are some of the features that you plan on adding to your service? – Tobias
  • Do you intend to run Podbuzzz as a side project or do you envision it becoming a company with its own staff? – Tobias
  • In addition to your work with Podbuzzz as a way for podcasters to gain visibility for their shows, you’re also working on an analytics platform for the same target audience. Can you explain a bit about that and the problems that you’ve had to overcome? – Tobias
  • What is it about podcasting that makes it hard to gain useful metrics and what is your strategy for overcoming some of those obstacles? – Tobias

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

PsychoPy with Jonathan Peirce - Episode 76

Summary

We’re delving into the complex workings of your mind this week on Podcast.init with Jonathan Peirce. He tells us about how he started the PsychoPy project and how it has grown in utility and popularity over the years. We discussed the ways that it has been put to use in myriad psychological experiments, the inner workings of how to design and execute those experiments, and what is in store for its future.

Brief Introduction

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • I would like to thank everyone who has donated to the show. Your contributions help us make the show sustainable.
  • Hired is sponsoring us this week. If you’re looking for a job as a developer or designer then Hired will bring the opportunities to you. Sign up at hired.com/podcastinit to double your signing bonus.
  • Once you land a job you can check out our other sponsor Linode for running your awesome new Python apps. Check them out at linode.com/podcastinit and get a $20 credit to try out their fast and reliable Linux virtual servers for your next project
  • You want to make sure your apps are error-free so give our last sponsor, Rollbar, a look. Rollbar is a service for tracking and aggregating your application errors so that you can find and fix the bugs in your application before your users notice they exist. Use the link rollbar.com/podcastinit to get 90 days and 300,000 errors for free on their bootstrap plan.
  • Visit our site to subscribe to our show, sign up for our newsletter, read the show notes, and get in touch.
  • By leaving a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music it becomes easier for other people to find us.
  • Join our community! Visit discourse.pythonpodcast.com to help us grow and connect our wonderful audience.
  • Your hosts as usual are Tobias Macey and Chris Patti
  • Today we’re interviewing Jonathan Peirce about PsychoPy, an open source application for the presentation and collection of stimuli for psychological experimentation

Interview with Jonathan Peirce

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python? – Chris
  • Can you start by telling us what PsychoPy is and how the project got started? – Tobias
  • How does PsychoPy compare feature wise against some of the proprietary alternatives? – Chris
  • In the documentation you mention that this project is useful for the fields of psychophysics, cognitive neuroscience and experimental psychology. Can you provide some insight into how those disciplines differ and what constitutes an experiment? – Tobias
  • Do you find that your users who have no previous formal programming training come up to speed with PsychoPy quickly? What are some of the challenges there? -Chris
  • Can you describe the internal architecture of PsychoPy and how you approached the design? – Tobias
  • How easy is it to extend PsychoPy with new types of stimulus? – Chris
  • What are some interesting challenges you faced when implementing PsychoPy? – Chris
  • I noticed that you support a number of output data formats, including pickle. What are some of the most popular analysis tools for users of PsychoPy? – Tobias
    • Have you investigated the use of the new Feather library? – Tobias
  • How is data input typically managed? Does PsychoPy support automated readings from test equipment or is that the responsibility of those conducting the experiment? – Tobias
  • What are some of the most interesting experiments that you are aware of having been conducted using PsychoPy? – Chris
  • While reading the docs I found the page describing the integration with the OSF (Open Science Framework) for sharing and validating an experiment and the collected data with other members of the field. Can you explain why that is beneficial to the researchers and compare it with other options such as GitHub for use within the sciences? – Tobias
  • Do you have a roadmap of features that you would like to add to PsychoPy or is it largely driven by contributions from practitioners who are extending it to suit their needs? – Tobias

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA