Software Engineering

Take A Deep Dive On How Code Completion Works And How To Customize It - Episode 366

Most developers have encountered code completion systems and rely on them as part of their daily work. They allow you to stay in the flow of programming, but have you ever stopped to think about how they work? In this episode Meredydd Luff takes us behind the scenes to dig into the mechanics of code completion engines and how you can customize them to fit your particular use case.

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Automatically Enforce Software Structures With Powerful Code Modifications Powered By LibCST - Episode 361

Programmers love to automate tedious processes, including refactoring your code. In order to support the creation of code modifications for your Python projects Jimmy Lai created LibCST. It provides a richly typed and high level API for creating and manipulating concrete syntax trees of your source code. In this episode Jimmy Lai and Zsolt Dollenstein explain how it works, some of the linting and automatic code modification utilities that you can build with it and how to get started with using it to maintain your own Python projects.

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Accelerate And Simplify Cloud Native Development For Kubernetes Environments With Gefyra - Episode 359

Cloud native architectures have been gaining prominence for the past few years due to the rising popularity of Kubernetes. This introduces new complications to development workflows due to the need to integrate with multiple services as you build new components for your production systems. In order to reduce the friction involved in developing applications for cloud native environments Michael Schilonka created Gefyra. In this episode he explains how it connects your local machine to a running Kubernetes environment so that you can rapidly iterate on your software in the context of the whole system. He also shares how the Django Hurricane plugin lets your applications work closely with the Kubernetes process model.

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Simplify And Scale Your Software Development Cycles By Putting On Pants (Build Tool) - Episode 352

Software development is a complex undertaking due to the number of options available and choices to be made in every stage of the lifecycle. In order to make it more scaleable it is necessary to establish common practices and patterns and introduce strong opinions. One area that can have a huge impact on the productivity of the engineers engaged with a project is the tooling used for building, validating, and deploying changes introduced to the software. In this episode maintainers of the Pants build tool Eric Arellano, Stu Hood, and Andreas Stenius discuss the recent updates that add support for more languages, efforts made to simplify its adoption, and the growth of the community that uses it. They also explore how using Pants as the single entry point for all of your routine tasks allows you to spend your time on the decisions that matter.

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Achieve Repeatable Builds Of Your Software On Any Machine With Earthly - Episode 351

It doesn’t matter how amazing your application is if you are unable to deliver it to your users. Frustrated with the rampant complexity involved in building and deploying software Vlad A. Ionescu created the Earthly tool to reduce the toil involved in creating repeatable software builds. In this episode he explains the complexities that are inherent to building software projects and how he designed the syntax and structure of Earthly to make it easy to adopt for developers across all language environments. By adopting Earthly you can use the same techniques for building on your laptop and in your CI/CD pipelines.

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Improve Your Productivity By Investing In Developer Experience Design For Your Projects - Episode 349

When we are creating applications we spend a significant amount of effort on optimizing the experience of our end users to ensure that they are able to complete the tasks that the system is intended for. A similar effort that we should all consider is optimizing the developer experience for ourselves and other engineers who contribute to the projects that we work on. Adam Johnson recently wrote a book on how to improve the developer experience for Django projects and in this episode he shares some of the insights that he has gained through that project and his work with clients to help you improve the experience that you and your team have when collaborating on software development.

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Fast, Flexible, and Incremental Task Automation With doit - Episode 345

Every software project needs a tool for managing the repetitive tasks that are involved in building, running, and deploying the code. Frustrated with the limitations of tools like Make, Scons, and others Eduardo Schettino created doit to handle task automation in his own work and released it as open source. In this episode he shares the story behind the project, how it is implemented under the hood, and how you can start using it in your own projects to save you time and effort.

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Make Your Code More Readable With The Magic Of Refactoring Using Sourcery - Episode 308

Writing code that is easy to read and understand will have a lasting impact on you and your teammates over the life of a project. Sometimes it can be difficult to identify opportunities for simplifying a block of code, especially if you are early in your journey as a developer. If you work with senior engineers they can help by pointing out ways to refactor your code to be more readable, but they aren’t always available. Brendan Maginnis and Nick Thapen created Sourcery to act as a full time pair programmer sitting in your editor of choice, offering suggestions and automatically refactoring your Python code. In this episode they share their journey of building a tool to automatically find opportunities for refactoring in your code, including how it works under the hood, the types of refactoring that it supports currently, and how you can start using it in your own work today. It always pays to keep your tool box organized and your tools sharp and Sourcery is definitely worth adding to your repertoire.

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CrossHair: Your Automatic Pair Programmer - Episode 302

One of the perennial challenges in software engineering is to reduce the opportunity for bugs to creep into the system. Some of the tools in our arsenal that help in this endeavor include rich type systems, static analysis, writing tests, well defined interfaces, and linting. Phillip Schanely created the CrossHair project in order to add another ally in the fight against broken code. It sits somewhere between type systems, automated test generation, and static analysis. In this episode he explains his motivation for creating it, how he uses it for his own projects, and how to start incorporating it into yours. He also discusses the utility of writing contracts for your functions, and the differences between property based testing and SMT solvers. This is an interesting and informative conversation about some of the more nuanced aspects of how to write well-behaved programs.

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Exploring Literate Programming For Python Projects With nbdev - Episode 300

Creating well designed software is largely a problem of context and understanding. The majority of programming environments rely on documentation, tests, and code being logically separated despite being contextually linked. In order to weave all of these concerns together there have been many efforts to create a literate programming environment. In this episode Jeremy Howard of fast.ai fame and Hamel Husain of GitHub share the work they have done on nbdev. The explain how it allows you to weave together documentation, code, and tests in the same context so that it is more natural to explore and build understanding when working on a project. It is built on top of the Jupyter environment, allowing you to take advantage of the other great elements of that ecosystem, and it provides a number of excellent out of the box features to reduce the friction in adopting good project hygiene, including continuous integration and well designed documentation sites. Regardless of whether you have been programming for 5 days, 5 years, or 5 decades you should take a look at nbdev to experience a different way of looking at your code.

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