Software

Version Control For Your Machine Learning Projects - Episode 206

Summary

Version control has become table stakes for any software team, but for machine learning projects there has been no good answer for tracking all of the data that goes into building and training models, and the output of the models themselves. To address that need Dmitry Petrov built the Data Version Control project known as DVC. In this episode he explains how it simplifies communication between data scientists, reduces duplicated effort, and simplifies concerns around reproducing and rebuilding models at different stages of the projects lifecycle. If you work as part of a team that is building machine learning models or other data intensive analysis then make sure to give this a listen and then start using DVC today.

Announcements

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next app or want to try a project you hear about on the show, you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so take a look at our friends over at Linode. With 200 Gbit/s private networking, scalable shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40 Gbit/s public network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to scale up. And for your tasks that need fast computation, such as training machine learning models, they just launched dedicated CPU instances. Go to pythonpodcast.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute. And don’t forget to thank them for their continued support of this show!
  • Bots and automation are taking over whole categories of online interaction. Discover.bot is an online community designed to ​serve as a platform-agnostic digital space for bot developers and enthusiasts of all skill levels to learn from one another, share their stories, and move the conversation forward together. They regularly publish guides and resources to help you learn about topics such as bot development, using them for business, and the latest in chatbot news. For newcomers to the space they have the Beginners Guide To Bots that will teach you the basics of how bots work, what they can do, and where they are developed and published. To help you choose the right framework and avoid the confusion about which NLU features and platform APIs you will need they have compiled a list of the major options and how they compare. Go to pythonpodcast.com/discoverbot today to get started and thank them for their support of the show.
  • You listen to this show to learn and stay up to date with what’s happening in databases, streaming platforms, big data, and everything else you need to know about modern data management. For even more opportunities to meet, listen, and learn from your peers you don’t want to miss out on this year’s conference season. We have partnered with organizations such as O’Reilly Media, Dataversity, and the Open Data Science Conference. Go to pythonpodcast.com/conferences to learn more and take advantage of our partner discounts when you register.
  • Visit the site to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, and read the show notes. And if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions I would love to hear them. You can reach me on Twitter at @Podcast__init__ or email [email protected])
  • To help other people find the show please leave a review on iTunes and tell your friends and co-workers
  • Join the community in the new Zulip chat workspace at pythonpodcast.com/chat
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Dmitry Petrov about DVC, an open source version control system for machine learning projects

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • Can you start by explaining what DVC is and how it got started?
  • How do the needs of machine learning projects differ from other software applications in terms of version control?
  • Can you walk through the workflow of a project that uses DVC?
    • What are some of the main ways that it differs from your experience building machine learning projects without DVC?
  • In addition to the data that is used for training, the code that generates the model, and the end result there are other aspects such as the feature definitions and hyperparameters that are used. Can you discuss how those factor into the final model and any facilities in DVC to track the values used?
  • In addition to version control for software applications, there are a number of other pieces of tooling that are useful for building and maintaining healthy projects such as linting and unit tests. What are some of the adjacent concerns that should be considered when building machine learning projects?
  • What types of metrics do you track in DVC and how are they collected?
    • Are there specific problem domains or model types that require tracking different metric formats?
  • In the documentation it mentions that the data files live outside of git and can be managed in external storage systems. I’m wondering if there are any plans to integrate with systems such as Quilt or Pachyderm that provide versioning of data natively and what would be involved in adding that support?
  • What was your motivation for implementing this system in Python?
    • If you were to start over today what would you do differently?
  • Being a venture backed startup that is producing open source products, what is the value equation that makes it worthwile for your investors?
  • What have been some of the most interesting, challenging, or unexpected aspects of building DVC?
  • What do you have planned for the future of DVC?

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  • Tobias
  • Dmitry
    • Go outside and get some fresh air 🙂

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Keep Your Code Clean Using pre-commit with Anthony Sottile - Episode 178

Summary

Maintaining the health and well-being of your software is a never-ending responsibility. Automating away as much of it as possible makes that challenge more achievable. In this episode Anthony Sottile describes his work on the pre-commit framework to simplify the process of writing and distributing functions to make sure that you only commit code that meets your definition of clean. He explains how it supports tools and repositories written in multiple languages, enforces team standards, and how you can start using it today to ship better software.

Preface

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next app you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so check out Linode. With private networking, shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40Gbit network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to scale up. Go to podcastinit.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute.
  • Visit the site to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, and read the show notes. And if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions I would love to hear them. You can reach me on Twitter at @Podcast__init__ or email [email protected])
  • To help other people find the show please leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, tell your friends and co-workers, and share it on social media.
  • Join the community in the new Zulip chat workspace at podcastinit.com/chat
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Anthony Sottile about pre-commit, a framework for managing and maintaining hooks for multiple languages

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • Can you start by describing what a pre-commit hook is and some of the ways that they are useful for developers?
  • What was you motivation for creating a framework to manage your pre-commit hooks?
    • How does it differ from other projects built to manage these hooks?
  • What are the steps for getting someone started with pre-commit in a new project?
  • Which other event hooks would be most useful to implement for maintaining the health of a repository?
  • What types of operations are most useful for ensuring the health of a project?
  • What types of routines should be avoided as a pre-commit step?
  • Installing the hooks into a user’s local environment is a manual step, so how do you ensure that all of your developers are using the configured hooks?
    • What factors have you found that lead to developers skipping or disabling hooks?
  • How is pre-commit implemented and how has that design evolved from when you first started?
    • What have been the most difficult aspects of supporting multiple languages and package managers?
    • What would you do differently if you started over today?
    • Would you still use Python?
  • For someone who wants to write a plugin for pre-commit, what are the steps involved?
  • What are some of the strangest or most unusual uses of pre-commit hooks that you have seen?
  • What are your plans for the future of pre-commit?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Destroy All Software With Gary Bernhardt - Episode 159

Summary

Many developers enter the market from backgrounds that don’t involve a computer science degree, which can lead to blind spots of how to approach certain types of problems. Gary Bernhardt produces screen casts and articles that aim to teach these principles with code to make them approachable and easy to understand. In this episode Gary discusses his views on the state of software education, both in academia and bootcamps, the theoretical concepts that he finds most useful in his work, and some thoughts on how to build better software.

Preface

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next app you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so check out Linode. With private networking, shared block storage, node balancers, and a 200Gbit network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to scale up. Go to podcastinit.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute.
  • Finding a bug in production is never a fun experience, especially when your users find it first. Airbrake error monitoring ensures that you will always be the first to know so you can deploy a fix before anyone is impacted. With open source agents for Python 2 and 3 it’s easy to get started, and the automatic aggregations, contextual information, and deployment tracking ensure that you don’t waste time pinpointing what went wrong. Go to podcastinit.com/airbrake today to sign up and get your first 30 days free, and 50% off 3 months of the Startup plan.
  • To get worry-free releases download GoCD, the open source continous delivery server built by Thoughworks. You can use their pipeline modeling and value stream map to build, control and monitor every step from commit to deployment in one place. And with their new Kubernetes integration it’s even easier to deploy and scale your build agents. Go to podcastinit.com/gocd to learn more about their professional support services and enterprise add-ons.
  • Visit the site to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, and read the show notes. And if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions I would love to hear them. You can reach me on Twitter at @Podcast__init__ or email [email protected])
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Gary Bernhardt about teaching and learning Python in the current software landscape

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • As someone who makes a living from teaching aspects of programming what is your view on the state of software education?
    • What are some of the ways that we as an industry can improve the experience of new developers?
    • What are we doing right?
  • You spend a lot of time exploring some of the fundamental aspects of programming and computation. What are some of the lessons that you have learned which transcend software languages?
    • Utility of graphs in understanding software
    • Mechanical sympathy
  • What are the benefits of ‘from scratch’ tutorials that explore the steps involved in building simple versions of complex topics such as compilers or web frameworks?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Mycroft with Steve Penrod - Episode 82

Summary

Speech is the most natural interface for communication, and yet we force ourselves to conform to the limitations of our tools in our daily tasks. As computation becomes cheaper and more ubiquitous and artificial intelligence becomes more capable, voice becomes a more practical means of controlling our environments. This week Steve Penrod shares the work that is being done on the Mycroft project and the company of the same name. He explains how he met the other members of the team, how the project got started, what it can do right now, and where they are headed in the future.

Brief Introduction

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • I would like to thank everyone who has donated to the show. Your contributions help us make the show sustainable.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next project you’ll need somewhere to deploy it. Check out Linode at linode.com/podcastinit and get a $20 credit to try out their fast and reliable Linux virtual servers for running your awesome app.
  • You’ll want to make sure that your users don’t have to put up with bugs, so you should use Rollbar for tracking and aggregating your application errors to find and fix the bugs in your application before your users notice they exist. Use the link rollbar.com/podcastinit to get 90 days and 300,000 errors for free on their bootstrap plan.
  • Visit our site to subscribe to our show, sign up for our newsletter, read the show notes, and get in touch.
  • To help other people find the show you can leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, and tell your friends and co-workers
  • Join our community! Visit discourse.pythonpodcast.com to talk to previous guests and other listeners of the show.
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Steve Penrod about the company and project Mycroft, a voice controlled, AI powered personal assistant written in Python.

Interview with Steve Penrod

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • Can you start by describing what Mycroft is and how the project and business got started?
  • How is Mycroft architected and what are the biggest challenges that you have encountered while building this project?
  • What are some of the possible applications of Mycroft?
  • Why would someone choose to use Mycroft in place of other platforms such as Amazon’s Alexa or Google’s personal assistant?
  • What kinds of machine learning approaches are being used in Mycroft and do they require a remote system for execution or can they be run locally?
  • What kind of hardware is needed for someone who wants to build their own Mycroft and what does the install process look like?
  • It can be difficult to run a business based on open source. What benefits and challenges are introduced by making the software that powers Mycroft freely available?
  • What are the mechanisms for extending Mycroft to add new capabilities?
  • What are some of the most surprising and innovative uses of Mycroft that you have seen?
  • What are the long term goals for the Mycroft project and the business that you have formed around it?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Annapoornima Koppad - Episode 81

Summary

Annapoornima Koppad is a director of the PSF, founder of the Bangalore chapter of PyLadies, and is a Python instructor at the Indian Institute of Science. In this week’s episode she talks about how she got started with Python, her experience running the PyLadies meetup, and working with the PSF.

Brief Introduction

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • I would like to thank everyone who has donated to the show. Your contributions help us make the show sustainable.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next project you’ll need somewhere to deploy it. Check out Linode at linode.com/podcastinit and get a $20 credit to try out their fast and reliable Linux virtual servers for running your awesome app.
  • You’ll want to make sure that your users don’t have to put up with bugs, so you should use Rollbar for tracking and aggregating your application errors to find and fix the bugs in your application before your users notice they exist. Use the link rollbar.com/podcastinit to get 90 days and 300,000 errors for free on their bootstrap plan.
  • Visit our site to subscribe to our show, sign up for our newsletter, read the show notes, and get in touch.
  • To help other people find the show you can leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, and tell your friends and co-workers
  • Join our community! Visit discourse.pythonpodcast.com for your opportunity to find out about upcoming guests, suggest questions, and propose show ideas.
  • Your hosts as usual are Tobias Macey and Chris Patti
  • Today we’re interviewing Annapoornima Koppad about her career with Python and her experiences running the PyLadies chapter in Bangalore, India and being a director for the Python Software Foundation.

Interview with Annapoornima Koppad

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python? – Tobias
  • I noticed that you have been freelancing for several years now. How much of that has been in Python and how has that fed back into your other activities? – Tobias
  • While preparing for this interview I came across the book that you self-published on Amazon. What was your motivation for writing it and who is the target audience? – Tobias
  • Can you tell us about your experience with starting the PyLadies group in Bangalore? What were some of the biggest challenges that you encountered and how have you approached the task of growing awareness and membership of the group? – Tobias
  • You recently started teaching Python at the Indian Institute of Science. What kinds of subject matter do you cover in your lessons? – Tobias
  • What is it about Python and its community that has inspired you to dedicate so much of your time to contributing back to it? – Tobias
  • In what ways would you like to see the Python ecosystem improve? – Tobias
  • You were voted in as a director of the Python Software Foundation in the most recent election. Can you share what responsibilities that entails? – Tobias
  • What would you like to achieve with your time in the PSF? – Tobias

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Python for GIS with Sean Gillies - Episode 80

Summary

Location is an increasingly relevant aspect of software systems as we have more internet connected devices with GPS capabilities. GIS (Geographic Information Systems) are used for processing and analyzing this data, and fortunately Python has a suite of libraries to facilitate these endeavors. This week Sean Gillies, an author and contributor of many of these tools, shares the story of his career and contributions, and the work that he is doing at MapBox.

Brief Introduction

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • I would like to thank everyone who has donated to the show. Your contributions help us make the show sustainable.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next project you’ll need somewhere to deploy it. Check out Linode at linode.com/podcastinit and get a $20 credit to try out their fast and reliable Linux virtual servers for running your awesome app.
  • You’ll want to make sure that your users don’t have to put up with bugs, so you should use Rollbar for tracking and aggregating your application errors to find and fix the bugs in your application before your users notice they exist. Use the link rollbar.com/podcastinit to get 90 days and 300,000 errors for free on their bootstrap plan.
  • Visit our site to subscribe to our show, sign up for our newsletter, read the show notes, and get in touch.
  • To help other people find the show you can leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, and tell your friends and co-workers
  • Join our community! Visit discourse.pythonpodcast.com for your opportunity to find out about upcoming guests, suggest questions, and propose show ideas.
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey
  • Today I’m interviewing Sean Gillies about writing Geographic Information Systems in Python.

Interview with Sean Gillies

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • Can you start by describing what Geographic Information Systems are and what kinds of projects might take advantage of them?
  • How did you first get involved in the area of GIS and location-based computation?
  • What was the state of the Python ecosystem like for writing these kinds of applications?
  • You have created and contributed to a number of the canonical tools for building GIS systems in Python. Can you list at least some of them and describe how they fit together for different applications?
  • What are some of the unique challenges associated with trying to model geographical features in a manner that allows for effective computation?
    • How does the complexity of modeling and computation scale with increasing land area?
  • Mapping and cartography have an incredibly long history with an ever-evolving set of tools. What does our digital age bring to this time-honored discipline that was previously impossible or impractical?
  • To build accurate and effective representations of our physical world there are a number of domains involved, such as geometry and geography. What advice do you have for someone who is interested in getting started in this particular niche?
  • What level of expertise would you advise for someone who simply wants to add some location-aware features to their application?
  • I know that you joined Mapbox a little while ago. Which parts of their stack are written in Python?
  • What are the areas where Python still falls short and which languages or tools do you turn to in those cases?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

K Lars Lohn - Episode 79

Summary

K Lars Lohn has had a long and varied career, spending his most recent years at Mozilla. This week he shares some of his stories about getting involved with Python, his work with Mozilla, and his inspiration for the closing keynote at PyCon US 2016. He also elaborates on the intricate mazes that he draws and his life as an organic farmer in Oregon.

Brief Introduction

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • I would like to thank everyone who has donated to the show. Your contributions help us make the show sustainable. For details on how to support the show you can visit our site at pythonpodcast.com
  • Linode is sponsoring us this week. Check them out at linode.com/podcastinit and get a $20 credit to try out their fast and reliable Linux virtual servers for your next project
  • We also have a new sponsor this week. Rollbar is a service for tracking and aggregating your application errors so that you can find and fix the bugs in your application before your users notice they exist. Use the link rollbar.com/podcastinit to get 90 days and 300,000 errors for free on their bootstrap plan.
  • Visit our site to subscribe to our show, sign up for our newsletter, read the show notes, and get in touch.
  • To help other people find the show you can leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, and tell your friends and co-workers
  • Join our community! Visit discourse.pythonpodcast.com for your opportunity to find out about upcoming guests, suggest questions, and propose show ideas.
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey
  • Today we’re interviewing K Lars Lohn about his career, his art, and his work with Mozilla

Interview with K Lars Lohn

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • You have an interesting pair of articles on your website that attempt to detail how you perceive code and why you think that formatting should be configured in a manner analogous to CSS. Can you explain a bit about how your particular perception affects the way that you program?
  • On your website you have some images of incredibly detailed artwork that are actually mazes. Can you describe some of your creation process for those?
  • What is it about mazes that keeps you interested in them and how did you first start using them as a form of visual art?
  • At Mozilla you have helped to create a project called Socorro which utilizes complexity analysis for correlating stacktraces. How did you conceive of that approach to error monitoring?
  • Can you describe how Socorro is architected and how it works under the covers?
  • At this year’s PyCon US you presented the closing keynote and it was one of the most engaging talks that I’ve seen. Where did you get the inspiration for the content and the mixed media approach?
  • For anyone who hasn’t seen it, you managed to weave together a very personal story with a musical performance, and some applications of complexity analysis into a seamless experience. How much did you have to practice before you felt comfortable delivering that in front of an audience?
  • In addition to your technical career you are also very focused on living in a manner that is sustainable and in tune with your environment. What kinds of synergies and conflicts exist between your professional and personal philosophies?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Lorena Mesa - Episode 78

Summary

One of the great strengths of the Python community is the diversity of backgrounds that our practitioners come from. This week Lorena Mesa talks about how her focus on political science and civic engagement led her to a career in software engineering and data analysis. In addition to her professional career she founded the Chicago chapter of PyLadies, helps teach women and kids how to program, and was voted onto the board of the PSF.

Brief Introduction

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • I would like to thank everyone who has donated to the show. Your contributions help us make the show sustainable.
  • Check out our sponsor Linode for running your awesome new Python apps. Check them out at linode.com/podcastinit and get a $20 credit to try out their fast and reliable Linux virtual servers for your next project
  • You want to make sure your apps are error-free so give our other sponsor, Rollbar, a look. Rollbar is a service for tracking and aggregating your application errors so that you can find and fix the bugs in your application before your users notice they exist. Use the link rollbar.com/podcastinit to get 90 days and 300,000 errors for free on their bootstrap plan.
  • Visit our site to subscribe to our show, sign up for our newsletter, read the show notes, and get in touch.
  • By leaving a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music it becomes easier for other people to find us.
  • Join our community! Visit discourse.pythonpodcast.com to help us grow and connect our wonderful audience.
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey
  • Today we’re interviewing Lorena Mesa about what inspires her in her work as a software engineer and data analyst.

Interview with Lorena Mesa

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • How did your original interests in political science and community outreach lead to your current role as a software engineer?
  • You dedicate a lot of your time to organizations that help teach programming to women and kids. What are some of the most meaningful experiences that you have been able to facilitate?
  • Can you talk a bit about your work getting the PyLadies chapter in Chicago off the ground and what the reaction has been like?
  • Now that you are a member of the board for the PSF, what are your goals in that position?
  • What is it about software development that made you want to change your career path?
  • What are some of the most interesting projects that you have worked on, whether for your employer or for fun?
  • Do you think that the bootcamp you attended did a good job of preparing you for a position in industry?
  • What is your view on the concept that software development is the modern form of literacy? Do you think that everyone should learn how to program?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Podbuzzz with Kyle Martin - Episode 77

Summary

Podcasts are becoming more popular now than they ever have been. Podbuzzz is a service for helping podcasters to track their reviews and imporove SEO to reach a wider audience. In this episode we spoke with Kyle Martin about his experience using Python to build Podbuzzz and manage it in production.

Brief Introduction

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • I would like to thank everyone who has donated to the show. Your contributions help us make the show sustainable.
  • You need a place to run your awesome new Python apps, so check out our sponsor Linode at linode.com/podcastinit and get a $20 credit to try out their fast and reliable Linux virtual servers for your next project.
  • You want to make sure your apps are error-free so give our next sponsor, Rollbar, a look. Rollbar is a service for tracking and aggregating your application errors so that you can find and fix the bugs in your application before your users notice they exist. Use the link rollbar.com/podcastinit to get 90 days and 300,000 errors for free on their bootstrap plan.
  • Visit our site to subscribe to our show, sign up for our newsletter, read the show notes, and get in touch.
  • By leaving a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music it becomes easier for other people to find us.
  • Join our community! Visit discourse.pythonpodcast.com to help us grow and connect our wonderful audience.
  • Your hosts as usual are Tobias Macey and Chris Patti
  • Today we’re interviewing Kyle Martin about Podbuzzz

Interview with Kyle Martin

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python? – Chris
  • Can you start by explaining what Podbuzz is? – Tobias
  • Why did you end up choosing Python as the language for building thx#is service? – Tobias
  • What have been the biggest engineering challenges in building Podbuzzz? – Tobias
  • How did you conceive of the idea to build Podbuzzz and what inspired you to provide it as a service? – Tobias
  • Part of the service that you are building is a widget that encourages listeners to rate a podcast on iTunes. Why is that important and what are some of the techniques that you have leveraged to determine the most effective messaging? – Tobias
  • What are some of the features that you plan on adding to your service? – Tobias
  • Do you intend to run Podbuzzz as a side project or do you envision it becoming a company with its own staff? – Tobias
  • In addition to your work with Podbuzzz as a way for podcasters to gain visibility for their shows, you’re also working on an analytics platform for the same target audience. Can you explain a bit about that and the problems that you’ve had to overcome? – Tobias
  • What is it about podcasting that makes it hard to gain useful metrics and what is your strategy for overcoming some of those obstacles? – Tobias

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Dave Beazley - Episode 72

Summary

Dave Beazley has been using and teaching Python since the early days of the language. He has also been instrumental in spreading the gospel of asynchronous programming and the many ways that it can improve the performance of your programs. This week I had the pleasure of speaking with him about his history with the language and some of his favorite presentations and projects.

Brief Introduction

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • I would like to thank everyone who has donated to the show. Your contributions help us make the show sustainable. For details on how to support the show you can visit our site at pythonpodcast.com
  • Linode is sponsoring us this week. Check them out at linode.com/podcastinit and get a $20 credit to try out their fast and reliable Linux virtual servers for your next project
  • We are also sponsored by Sentry this week. Stop hoping your users will report bugs. Sentry’s real-time tracking gives you insight into production deployments and information to reproduce and fix crashes. Check them out at getsentry.com and use the code podcastinit at signup to get a $50 credit!
  • Hired has also returned as a sponsor this week. If you’re looking for a job as a developer or designer then Hired will bring the opportunities to you. Sign up at hired.com/podcastinit to double your signing bonus.
  • Visit our site to subscribe to our show, sign up for our newsletter, read the show notes, and get in touch.
  • To help other people find the show you can leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, and tell your friends and co-workers
  • Join our community! Visit discourse.pythonpodcast.com for your opportunity to find out about upcoming guests, suggest questions, and propose show ideas.
  • Your hosts as usual are Tobias Macey and Chris Patti
  • Today we’re interviewing Dave Beazley about his career with Python

Interview with Dave Beazley

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python? – Tobias
  • How has Python and its community helped to shape your career? – Tobias
  • What are some of the major themes that you have focused on in your work? – Tobias
  • One of the things that you are known for is doing live-coding presentations, many of which are fairly advanced. What is it about that format that appeals to you? – Tobias
    • What are some of your favorite stories about a presentation that didn’t quite go as planned? – Tobias
  • You have given a large number of talks at various conferences. What are some of your favorites? – Tobias
  • What impact do you think that asynchronous programming will have on the future of the Python language and ecosystem? – Tobias
  • Are there any features that you see in other languages that you would like to have incorporated in Python? – Tobias
  • On the about page for your website you talk about some of the low-level code and hardware knowledge that you picked up by working with computers as a kid. Do you think that people who are getting started with programming now are missing out by not getting exposed to the kinds of hardware and software that was present before computing became mainstream?
  • You have had the opportunity to work on a large variety of projects, both on a hobby and professional level. What are some of your favorites? – Tobias
  • What is it about Python that has managed to hold your interest for so many years? – Tobias

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA